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Category Archive for: ‘Sushi’
Cross Shrimp Off Your Party List

I just read a disturbing report titled “5 Reasons To Never Eat Shrimp Again” From Prevention Mag’s blog.

Shrimping has changed

Mostly gone are the days of Bubba Gump’s shimp boats with nets.  Now, picture huge nets in the ocean supported by colorful plastic boxes, or even more commonly, dozens of rice paddy like ponds filled with shrimp.  Easy catch, easily processed by hundreds of underpaid, government subsidized workers.

shrimp-farm  Shrimp farm aerial original.jpg  shrimpfarms608

This process is known as shrimp farming.  Farming shrimp began in the 1970 and has grown rapidly mostly in Asian countries such as Thailand.  Here in lies the problem.  The majority of shrimp purchased in the US has been imported from these overseas farms.  Because the shrimp are “farmed” in foreign countries, the US has little or no control over the conditions the shrimp are raised in and ultimately the quality and safety of the shrimp.

Chemicals

In order to increase the profitability of the farms, shrimp are packed into shallow ponds while ingesting their own waste materials.  Complete “crops” of shrimp can be lost to disease or parasites.  To prevent these expensive loses farmers dose the ponds with high levels of antibiotics and pesticides.  These chemicals, many times, are ones currently banned for use in the United States.  If you are counting on the FDA to protect you, think again.  According to a 2011 report, only 1% of imported seafood is tested for these chemicals.

Feed Lots

Do these methods of growing protein sound familiar?  They do to me.  It is exactly like cattle fed lots and fowl houses.  Animals are packed into small areas where they graze, walk and even feed on their own waste.  When conditions cause disease, no problem, just dose them with antibiotics and when the feces attract flies, tics, fleas, lice, mites and other disease carrying pests, again, no problem, just spray them all with pesticides.

cattle-feedlot-002 cattle-feedlot-spray Chicken-farm-11-29-111 Chicken spraying

Global Warming

You may wonder, as I did, how shrimp farming can contribute to global warming.  It seems that since the 1970’s shrimp farming has proven so profitable that the major farming countries, Thailand, Ecuador, Indonesia, China, Mexico and Vietnam have been cutting down their mangrove forests to make room for more ponds.  Mangrove forests absorb more carbon dioxide than any other ecosystem in the world, including the rain forests.  Not only that, but mangroves are breeding grounds for all types of sea creatures and their extensive root system prevents erosion during storms.

The Wild-caught Alternative

So, I will just eat wild-caught shrimp, just as I only eat wild-caught salmon.  Not so fast.  Wild-caught shrimping is extremely wasteful.  For every pound of shrimp caught, there can be as much as 5 pounds of by-catch, which are other species caught in the nets.  Much is written about the endangered turtles being killed by these nets so I won’t go on.  Looks like I will be giving up shrimp all together.  Crayfish are almost the same thing and can be farmed in the US.  Crayfish are bottom feeders and live in fresh water.

We Need To Stop Eating Sea Food

My job is to point out to you the problems I find.  Your job is to prove me right or wrong or ask me enough questions to more deeply explore the problem.  I have pointed out that the problem is little or no regulation on imported sea food of all kinds to this country.  I’m telling you to stop eating all imported and wild caught sea food.  Your turn. – jughandle

Do your own research, prove me wrong, please prove me wrong, because I’m seeing this as a serious problem!

 

 

Life Changing Posts

Important concepts to master.  In the past couple of years, let’s see, we’ve talked about:

Milk and Lactose IntoleranceHow to prevent and reverse heart diseaseSodium and Salt.

How to properly set a table and  Is diet soda good or bad.

I introduced you to Matcha tea and tea in general.

I explained that there are things that you shouldn’t put in the freezer  and what

to stock your pantry with as well as your freezer.

I showed you my favorite carved pumpkins, my favorite blogs to read

and we talked about Grits.

We learned how to de-bone a whole chicken, how to can things, how to blanch and how to cook rice.

We also learned how to make pie dough from scratch and our own scratch pasta.  Then we studied

how to roast vegetables and how to make Kimchi.  We learned about the 5 basic sauces and how to modify them.

We even learned harder looking dishes like Beef Wellington and Sushi.

We studied nutrition and diets and why vegan isn’t a bad idea.  We now know that there are at least 12 foods that are bad for the

planet.

More Important concepts to master

You wanted to learn about fiber and calories as well as the superfoods to eat.   But most of all you wanted to know about

what is in your food and mistakes we make that make us fatter.  I showed you where I get my coupons and how the Kroger Store is laid out.

I warned you about chemicals and pesticides in our food and told you which food is better to be bought organically raised.

 

I’ve shared over 55 of the best recipes I could find.  Now I need to know what else you’d like to learn about.  Please let me know. – Jughandle

 

Things NOT to put in the Freezer

This is a short FYI on what things you shouldn’t freeze.  As always I explore ideas that I have little knowledge of or would like to be more well informed about.

Dairy

You can freeze:

  • hard cheeses – to give them additional life, but usually they last pretty long anyway.

Don’t freeze:

  • eggs in their shells- they lose their consistency and can crack.  If you want to freeze eggs break them into a freezer bag and scrabble them.
  • milk or cream – they can separate

Spices

Apparently some dry spices with change flavor and get bitter if they are frozen.
Don’t freeze:
  •  pepper corns
  • cloves
  • garlic
  • green pepper
  • imitation vanilla
  • onions
  • paprika
  • celery
  • sage
  • salt

Fresh Vegetables and Fruit

Most vegetables and fruits have a high content of water that will break down the cell walls when frozen and get mushy and brown when defrosted.
Don’t freeze:
  • fresh lettuce
  • fresh spinach
  • fresh cabbage
  • any leafy vegetable
  • potatoes – they get grainy and soft
You Can freeze:
  • cooked vegetables

Canned foods

Never freeze canned food in the can.  It breaks the seal and can contaminate the food
Fish and Meat

I can’t find any fish or meat products that can’t be frozen but be aware that freezing does NOT kill harmful bacteria, it only slows the growth.  So never refreeze fish or meat that has defrosted or has been frozen before.  You can cook it, then freeze it again.  The cooking process kills the bacteria and gives you a fresh start if cooked properly.

Do freeze:

raw fish over night before eating as sashimi or sushi, because the freezing kills the parasites in the flesh.

Other Stuff

Don’t freeze:

  • Fried foods, especially deep fried foods, they will taste stale
  • Gravies and sauces with wheat in them will tend to separate
  • Cooked pasta will get very mushy
  • Crumb toppings on casseroles will get soggy.  Wait to add the crumbs until you are ready to reheat to serve
  • Soft cake frostings will get tacky and might separate
  • Artificial sweeteners (why would you want to eat them any how) will lose their effectiveness when frozen.
Remember when you do freeze stuff, to wrap them well, removing as much air as possible and to cool them before you freeze them.  A full freezer is more economical to operate. Label your food packages. Happy eating Fat Farmers – Jughandle

 

Sushi and how to make it

Sushi means “sour-tasting”.  At its most common denominator, sushi is cooked short grained sticky rice that has been “vinegared”.  It is also known as shari.  Wikipedia says, “The vinegar produced from fermenting rice breaks down the fish proteins into amino acids. This results in one of the five basic tastes, called umami in Japanese”

Many people think of raw fish when they hear the word sushi.  Actually, there are raw forms of fish in some sushi, but sushi can be anything that contains the vinegared rice- shari.  Some forms of sushi don’t have any fish at all.  Raw or uncooked fish is known as sashimi.  That is another story for another day.  Today we talk about sushi.

Sushi Rice

The only thing common to a sushi dish is the rice.  If you can’t find sushi rice at your local store, any short grained rice will do or you can buy it at the Farm Store here.

You will also need:

To Make The Sushi Rolls:

  • Bamboo sushi Mat – available here
  • Seaweed Nori sheets – available here or here
  • Plastic wrap to cover your mat

For the Vinegar Mix:

Heat and mix the following.  Cool to room temp before mixing into the rice

In every 1 cup of cooked sushi rice mix:

  • 1/3 c Rice vinegar
  • 2 T sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt

Without A Rice Cooker

  • Rinse the rice until clear
  • cover the rice in the pot by one inch
  • bring to a boil on high heat, then reduce the heat to medium and cook 20 minutes more – never take the lid off while cooking
  • remove rice to a bowl and cool to room temp
  • Fold in the vinegar mixture gently not to make the rice pasty

With a Rice Cooker – video

 

How To Make A Maki Roll- video

 

How To Make A Tiger Roll – video

 

How To Make A California Roll – video