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I’m Back

Dear Friends and followers,

I have taken a self imposed hiatus for the last couple of months due to mental and physical health.  My mental health problems are most assuredly because of my physical health.  I am roughly 2 weeks away from my 60th birthday and during the last month or two I wasn’t complete sure that I would be around for that milestone event.

Because I am completely aware that I am not the only human with problems and that my problems aren’t as bad as some other people’s, I won’t dwell on them.  Instead I’m going to talk about how to get through the mental end of the thing which, of course, is really the hard part anyway.

You can have a hang nail and if you mentally let it get you down you can get to a dark place that makes everything bad.  Conversely, you could have stage 4 bone cancer and have the mental out look of an Olympian and be in a better place than the hang nail victim.

Abraham Lincoln was quoted as saying: “Success is the ability to go from one failure to another while maintaining a good attitude.”

The Navy Seals who have to endure the most grueling training program known to exist say that the key to getting through any problem is to not to look too far into the future, seeing all the pain you have left to receive, it is to focus on the moment and survive each minute, because “the only easy day was yesterday”.

I believe those two statement pretty much sum it up.  “Life”,as I paraphrase Yogi Berra,” is 90% mental and the other half is physical”  We all know what Yogi means and he is complete correct.  We have to find a way, to reach down and summon up from the deepest reaches of our psyche the effort to go on, minute by minute, hour by hour, day by day.  If we can do that, we can find a way to contribute to society and make our time on earth worthwhile.

By the way, you can’t get this crap from a book, or by watching TV, you have to find it within yourself.

 

Thanks for following my blog,

Jerry Jughandle Wooden, jr.

Kid Safe Alert: Sunny D

This blog is dedicated to helping you make the wise, healthy food choices.  With that in mind, Jughandle’s Fat Farm can not recommend Sunny D made by Procter & Gamble for either you or your children.

Read the Label

The two major ingredients are water and corn syrup.  Less than 2 percent is concentrated fruit juice.  The rest is artificial colors, sweeteners, canola oil and sodium hexametaphosphated.

Miss leading health claims

The label says 100% vitamin C.  That alone is NOT health.  Many vegetables and fruits contain 100 percent of your daily allotment of vitamin C in a single serving.

 

FoodFacts.com

Sunny D receives a very low 14 score on Foodfacts.com health index.

Sunny D contains:

MSG, corn, flavorings and other controversial additives including colorants.

Ingredients:

Icon

WaterCorn Syrup High Fructose Contains 2% or less of the Following: ( Juice(s) Concentrates (Orange(s),TangerinesApple(s)LimeGrapefruit), Citric Acid,Ascorbic AcidThiamin Hydrochloride (Vitamin B1),Flavor(s) NaturalCorn Starch ModifiedCanola Oil,Sodium CitrateCellulose GumXanthan GumSodium HexametaphosphateSodium BenzoateYellow 5,Yellow 6

Nutrition Facts

  • Serving Size 8 oz
  • Servings Per Container 16
  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories 120Calories from Fat 0
  • % Daily Value*
  • Total Fat 0g0%
  • Saturated Fat 0g0%
  • Trans Fat 0g
  • Cholesterol 0mg0%
  • Sodium 190mg8%
  • Total Carbohydrate 29g10%
  • Dietary Fiber 0g0%
  • Sugars 27g
  • Protein 0g
  • C100%
  • THIAMIN15%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Weight Watcher’s Winning Points®**: 2
Weight Watcher’s PointsPlus®**: 3
** Weight Watchers® and Points® are registered trademarks of Weight Watchers International, Inc. The number of Points provided here were calculated by Food Facts, Inc. based on published Weight Watchers International, Inc. information and do not imply sponsorship or endorsement of such number of Points, Food Facts, Inc., or the above product by Weight Watchers International, Inc.
staph in meat | Bacteria-Infused Meat Found in Grocery Stores | Rodale News

This isn’t another push for you to buy organically grown meats, or is it?  You be the judge.  Just the one fact that chickens, pigs, cows, turkeys and other food source animals are injected on a regular basis with antibiotics and other drugs to make them healthy should make you join the parade.  Those are the same antibiotics we use, and when we eat them in our food we they become useless to us over time.  Read on – jughandle

 

Bacteria-Infused Meat Found in Grocery Stores

I’m sorry for this image, but I need to get your attention

 

 

 

  MRSA antibotic resistant staff infection

 

BY LEAH ZERBE

Handle with care: A study found that supermarket meat can house bacteria that could infect your skin.

RODALE NEWS, EMMAUS, PA—Previous studies have detected nasty, food-poisoning bacteria in supermarket meat, but a study published Friday in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases sends the queasiness factor to a whole new level: Half of the U.S. supermarket meat sampled contained staph infection bacteria, including the hard-to-kill and potentially lethal MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) infection.

The researchers ID the overuse of antibiotics in industrial agriculture as a factor in the rise of superbugs in our grocery store food.

THE DETAILS:

Researchers tested 136 total samples (80 different brands) of ground beef, chicken breasts and thighs, ground pork and pork chops, and ground turkey and turkey cutlets purchased from 26 retail grocery stores in five U.S. cities: Chicago; Washington, DC; Fort Lauderdale, Florida; Los Angeles; and Flagstaff, Arizona. Although previous studies have found a strong link between antibiotic-resistant germs and factory farms, this study traces the dangerous bacteria into the food chain. Nearly 80 percent of the turkey products sampled contained staph bacteria; 42 percent of the pork harbored staph, while 41 percent of the chicken and 37 percent of the beef suffered staph contamination. Nearly all of the contaminated meat harbored staph bacteria resistant to at least one human antibiotic.

WHAT IT MEANS:

At the end of 2010, the Food and Drug Administration released a first-of-its-kind agency report, finding that factory farms use a whopping 30 million pounds of antibiotics each year. But even before the release of that report, scientists and doctors had been waving red flags regarding the overuse of antibiotics in farming, and how that, in turn, is threatening human health. In 2009, Prevention magazine published a special report, “The Superbug in Your Supermarket,” which found similar problems with your standard supermarket-bought meat. While MRSA was previously linked to hospital-acquired infections, a new source emerged in 2008, and it was linked back to huge hog farms. The good news is that cooking meat kills MRSA. The bad news is just handling the raw meat can give you a serious skin infection, particularly if you have a cut on your hand. And nose pickers, take heed. Wash your hands well after handling meat because MRSA loves to hang in your nasal passages.

Find out more about how to protect yourself from superbugs in food.

• Steer clear of CAFO meats. CAFO stands for concentrated animal-feeding operation, a nicer word for factory farm. These industrial facilities often use antibiotics to speed growth and prevent disease in their crammed conditions, which is what scientists say accelerates the rise of superbugs. The Union of Concerned Scientists estimates that industrial farms account for 70 percent of the antibiotics used in this country. That heavy use is making vitally important antibiotics work less well on humans.

To find safer forms of meat, check out our Guide to Buying Grass-Fed Beef, or visit LocalHarvest.org or EatWild.com to find organically raised, pastured meat. It’s likely more expensive, but it’s also more nutritious. If you’re strapped for cash, pastured eggs from hens that ate organic feed is a great option—way cheaper than buying four grass-fed Porterhouse steaks!

• Practice nontoxic, commonsense food safety. No matter where your food comes from, it’s always in your family’s best interest to practice good food-safety advice. However, don’t turn to toxic antibacterial soaps and sprays to disinfect. They’re also linked to the rise in superbugs. These stories contain safer alternatives:

via staph in meat | Bacteria-Infused Meat Found in Grocery Stores | Rodale News.

Off Topic – The 3 point shot

I bet you didn’t know that basketball introduced the 3 point shot in 1961 in the American Basketball league.  That league only lasted 1 1/2 seasons before folding.  Then in 1967 the ABA started and added all kinds of interesting “stuff”, like the 3 point shot and dunk contests.  I’m still pissed off that while I played high school basketball and could dunk, the no-dunk rule was in effect.  Heck, if the 3 point shot had been in effect while I was in high school, Fritz and I would never had touched the ball.  C*******and N**** would have jacked the ball as they brought it across the line.  I can’t imagine Coach Moses with the 3 point shot.

Where is the line?

The NCAA once only had the line at 19 feet.  That is the reason I’m writing this blog, because I noticed while watching a game the other night that there was just one 3 point line on the court and it seemed further back than I remembered.

From what I understand, the NBA has a 22-foot 3-point line in the corners and a 23-foot, 9-inch line elsewhere. The WNBA and the international game plays with a 20-foot, 6-inch line. The NCAA men’s game has a 20-foot, 9-inch line (a move from 19 ft 9 inches in 2008) while the NCAA women and high schools have a 19-foot, 9-inch line.

15 Different Frosting Recipes

Tired of the same old same old? Need something more than sticky on your buns?  Try one of these from MarthaSteward.com

1. Meringue Buttercream

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 5 large egg whites
  • Pinch cream of tartar
  • 1 pound (4 sticks) unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Directions

  1. In a small saucepan over medium heat, bring sugar and water to a boil. Clip a candy thermometer onto the saucepan. Boil the syrup, brushing down the sides of the pan with a pastry brush dipped in water to prevent crystallization, until the syrup registers 240 degrees (soft-ball stage).
  2. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat egg whites on low speed until foamy. Add cream of tartar, and beat on medium high until stiff but not dry peaks form.
  3. With the mixer running, pour the sugar syrup down the side of the bowl (to prevent splattering) into the egg whites in a steady stream, and beat on high speed until the steam is no longer visible, about 3 minutes. Beat in butter, piece by piece. Add vanilla; beat until smooth and spreadable, 3 to 5 minutes. If it looks curdled at any point during the beating process, continue beating until smooth.

2. Whipped Frosting

Ingredients

  • 3 large egg whites
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1/4 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Directions

  1. In a heatproof bowl set over (not in) a saucepan of simmering water, combine egg whites, sugar, salt, and water. Cook over medium, stirring constantly, until sugar has dissolved (or mixture registers 150 degrees on an instant-read thermometer), 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl. Using an electric mixer, beat on medium-high until glossy, stiff peaks form (do not overbeat), about 3 minutes; reduce speed to low, add vanilla extract, and beat just until combined. Use immediately.

3. Basic Buttercream

Ingredients

  • 12 ounces (3 sticks) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 pound confectioners’ sugar, sifted
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Directions

  1. Beat butter with a mixer on medium-high speed until pale and creamy, about 2 minutes.
  2. Reduce speed to medium. Add sugar, 1/2 cup at a time, beating after each addition, about 5 minutes. (After every 2 additions, increase speed to high, and beat for 10 seconds, then reduce speed to medium-high). Add vanilla, and beat until buttercream is smooth. Use immediately, or cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days. (Bring to room temperature, and beat on low speed until smooth before using.)

4. 7 minute frosting

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon light corn syrup
  • 3 large egg whites, room temperature

Directions

  1. In a small, heavy saucepan, combine 3/4 cup sugar, corn syrup, and 2 tablespoons water. Heat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until sugar has dissolved. Rub a bit between your fingers to make sure there is no graininess. Raise heat to bring to a boil. Do not stir anymore. Boil, washing down sides of pan with a pastry brush dipped in cold water from time to time to prevent the sugar from crystallizing, until a candy thermometer registers 230 degrees about 5 minutes. (Depending on the humidity, this can take anywhere from 4 to 10 minutes.)
  2. Meanwhile, in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whisk egg whites on medium speed until soft peaks form, about 2 1/2 minutes. Gradually add remaining 2 tablespoons sugar. Remove the syrup from the heat when the temperature reaches 230 degrees (it will keep rising as pan is removed from heat). Pour the syrup in a steady stream down the side of the bowl (to avoid splattering) containing the egg-white mixture, with the mixer on medium-low speed.
  3. Beat frosting on medium speed until cool, 5 to 10 minutes. The frosting should be thick and shiny. Use immediately.

5. Dark Chocolate Ganache

Ingredients

  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1 pound bittersweet chocolate, roughly chopped

Directions

  1. In a large saucepan, bring 2 cups heavy cream, 1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar, and 1/8 teaspoon salt to a boil. Remove from heat; add 1 pound bittersweet chocolate, roughly chopped, and let stand, without stirring, for 1 minute. Whisk just until combined. Refrigerate, stirring occasionally, until spreadable, about 1 hour.

6. Cream Cheese frosting

Ingredients

  • 1 pound (16 ounces) cream cheese, room temperature
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, cut into pieces, room temperature
  • 2 pounds confectioners’ sugar, sifted

Directions

  1. In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat cream cheese and vanilla until light and creamy, about 2 minutes. With mixer on medium speed, gradually add butter, beating until incorporated.
  2. Reduce mixer speed to low. Gradually add sugar, beating until incorporated.

7.  Brown Sugar Butter cream

Ingredients

  • 4 large egg whites
  • 1 cup packed light-brown sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 cups (3 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature, cut into tablespoons

Directions

  1. In a heatproof bowl set over (not in) a pan of simmering water, whisk together egg whites, sugar, and salt. Cook, whisking constantly, until the sugar has dissolved and the mixture is warm to the touch.
  2. Transfer to the clean bowl of an electric mixer. Beat on medium speed until fluffy and cooled, about 15 minutes.
  3. Raise speed to high; beat until stiff peaks form. Reduce speed to medium-low; add butter, 2 to 3 tablespoons at a time, until fully incorporated.

8.  Caramel frosting

Ingredients

  • 12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter
  • 1 package (16 ounces) confectioners’ sugar
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream, plus more if needed
  • 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
  • Pinch of salt

Directions

  1. In a small saucepan, melt butter over medium-high heat until nut-brown in color, about 8 minutes. Remove pan from heat and pour butter into a bowl, leaving any burned sediment behind; let cool.
  2. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, add confectioners’ sugar, vanilla, salt, and butter. With the mixer on low, slowly add cream; beat until smooth. If frosting seems too thick, stir another tablespoon cream into the mixture.

9. Mrs. Milman’s chocolate frosting

Ingredients

  • 24 ounces Nestle semisweet chocolate morsels
  • 4 cups whipping cream
  • 1 teaspoon light corn syrup

Directions

  1. Place chocolate morsels and cream in a heavy saucepan. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly with a rubber spatula, until combined and thickened, between 20 and 25 minutes. Increase the heat to medium low; cook, stirring, 3 minutes more. Remove pan from heat.
  2. Stir in corn syrup. Transfer frosting to a large metal bowl. Chill until cool enough to spread, about 2 hours, checking and stirring every 15 to 20 minutes. Use immediately.

10. Coconut-Pecan frosting

Ingredients

  • 3 large egg yolks
  • 1 can (12 ounces) evaporated milk
  • 1 1/4 cups packed light-brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 sticks (12 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cut into small pieces and brought to room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 2/3 cups (7 ounces) sweetened flaked coconut
  • 1 1/2 cups (6 ounces) pecans, toasted and coarsely chopped

Directions

  1. Combine egg yolks, evaporated milk, and brown sugar in a saucepan. Add butter, and cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until thick, about 10 minutes. Pour through a fine sieve into a bowl.
  2. Stir in vanilla, salt, coconut, and pecans. Let cool completely. Frosting can be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 1 day; bring to room temperature before using.

11. Maple Buttercream frosting

Ingredients

  • 6 large egg yolks
  • 2 cups pure maple syrup, preferably grade A dark amber
  • 1 pound (4 sticks) unsalted butter, chilled and cut into small pieces

Directions

  1. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat egg yolks on high speed until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, pour maple syrup into a medium saucepan. Place pan over medium-high heat; bring syrup to a boil. Cook syrup until a candy thermometer registers 240 degrees (just above soft-ball stage), about 15 minutes.
  3. Remove the saucepan from the heat. While the electric mixer is running, pour the syrup in a slow, steady stream down the side of the mixing bowl into the egg-yolk mixture (it is essential that the syrup touches the side of the bowl as you pour it in so the sugar will be very evenly incorporated and not splatter onto the sides of the bowl) until the syrup has been completely incorporated, about 1 1/2 minutes. Beat until the bowl is just slightly warm to the touch, 5 to 6 minutes.
  4. Add butter, one piece at a time, until all of it has been completely incorporated and the frosting is fluffy, about 4 minutes more. Use immediately.

12. Italian Meringue buttercream

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 5 large egg whites
  • Pinch of cream of tartar
  • 1 pound (4 sticks) unsalted butter, chilled
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Directions

  1. In a small saucepan over medium heat, bring sugar and 2/3 cup water to a boil. Continue boiling until syrup reaches 238 degrees on a candy thermometer (soft-ball stage).
  2. Meanwhile, place egg whites in the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, and beat on low speed until foamy. Add cream of tartar, and beat on medium-high speed until stiff but not dry; do not overbeat.
  3. With mixer running, add syrup to whites in a stream, beating on high speed until no longer steaming, about 3 minutes. Add butter bit by bit, beating until spreadable, 3 to 5 minutes; beat in vanilla. If icing curdles, keep beating until smooth.

13. Coconut meringue buttercream

Ingredients

  • 10 large egg whites
  • 2 1/4 cups sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 4 cups (8 sticks) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup cream of coconut
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure coconut extract

Directions

  1. Whisk egg whites, sugar, and salt in the heatproof bowl of an electric mixer set over a pan of simmering water until sugar has dissolved and mixture registers 160 degrees, about 3 minutes.
  2. Attach bowl to mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat on medium-high speed until cooled, about 10 minutes. Reduce speed to medium. Add butter; beat until pale and fluffy. Mix in cream of coconut and extract. Buttercream can be refrigerated in an airtight container up to 3 days; beat before using.

Variations

When Martha used this buttercream to frost the Coconut Column Cake, she used 2 1/2 cups sugar.

14. Brown Sugar Swiss meringue buttercream

Ingredients

  • 5 large egg whites
  • 1 2/3 cups packed dark-brown sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 4 sticks (2 cups) unsalted butter, room temperature

Directions

  1. Put egg whites, sugar, and salt into a heatproof bowl set over a pan of simmering water. Whisk until mixture registers 160 degrees, about 4 minutes.
  2. Beat on high speed until stiff, glossy peaks form, about 6 minutes. Reduce speed to medium-low. Add butter, 2 tablespoons at a time, beating after each addition (meringue will deflate slightly as butter is added). Beat until frosting is smooth and glossy, 3 to 5 minutes. Buttercream can be refrigerated airtight for up to 3 days; bring to room temperature, and beat before using.

15. Chocolate whipped cream frosting

Ingredients

  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 4 ounces finely chopped semisweet chocolate

Directions

  1. In a small saucepan, combine heavy cream and chocolate, and heat over medium heat until chocolate has melted. Remove from heat and refrigerate until well chilled.
  2. Place heavy cream mixture in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment; beat until thick and spreadable. Use immediately
Soak Your Nuts

I was given a heads up by a friend on an article about eating and soaking nuts grains, seeds and legumes before eating them.  The following is a loose synopsis of the article

Natures way

No, not the “Spirit” song.  Nature is one smart old broad.  And I mean that in the nicest way.  Nature includes some digestive and decay resistant chemicals in nuts and seeds, etc., to keep them viable until they have the opportunity to sprout and grow.  It only make sense that these chemicals would be toxic to animals and wash off easily with water.

Why soak nuts, grains and seeds?

1. To remove or reduce phytic acid.

2. To remove or reduce tannins.

3. To neutralize the enzyme inhibitors.

4. To encourage the production of beneficial enzymes.

5. To increase the amounts of vitamins, especially B vitamins.

6. To break down gluten and make digestion easier.

7. To make the proteins more readily available for absorption.

8. To prevent mineral deficiencies and bone loss.

9. To help neutralize toxins in the colon and keep the colon clean.

10. To prevent many health diseases and conditions.

“Soaking allows enzymes, lactobacilli and other helpful organisms to break down and neutralize a large portion of phytic acid in grains. Soaking in warm water also neutralizes enzyme inhibitors, present in all seeds, and encourages the production of numerous beneficial enzymes. The action of these enzymes also increases the amount of many vitamins, especially B vitamins. During the process of soaking and fermenting, gluten and other difficult-to-digest proteins are partially broken down into simpler components that are more readily available for absorption.”

What to Soak them In and how long?

Now, I’ve always soaked my dried beans overnight in water to make them easier to cook, but I didn’t know about the seeds and nuts and grains.  There are many methods suggested, but the simplest is plan old warm water.  Soak for 7 to 24 hours to neutralize the enzyme inhibitors.

If they start to sprout, all the better for you.

There you go.  You can then dry them in the refrigerator or eat them wet.  What ever you deside to do you’ll be a little healthier for doing it -thanks B – jughandle

To get the full article – click here

 

More Reasons to buy Organic

If you haven’t gotten on the organic band wagon, I’ve got some more convincing to do.  The following is largely from an article in Organic Gardening Mag.

Think about it

You should be eating a heavily weighted diet of plants and raw foods.  I don’t want to hear the same old BS that we are meat eaters and should be eating red meat.  That may have been true 100 years ago, but not know.  Chemistry has gotten into our diet.  Chemists have found ways to increase the yield of everything and haven’t thought about the long term costs until recently.  If you don’t eat organically grown food you are ingesting 12 or more chemicals  and pesticides that can  HARM you, your family and your future family.  The hormones in the dairy and meat we eat are changing the size of the human race.

Corn

Maybe you’ve heard of the chemical “Roundup”?  Supposed to be one of the safest weedkillers around.  So safe that chemists have genetically engineered crops like corn to be “Roundup ready”, meaning that a corn crop can be planted then when the weeds start to grow and compete with the corn, Boom, just fly by with a crop duster and spray Roundup on everything and the genetically engineered corn being resistant to the Roundup lives on while the weeds die.

Sounds great, doesn’t it.  Not so much.  Roundup is not just salt as we might have heard.  The main component of Roundup is GLYPHOSATE.  Glyphosate is a systemic chemical, which means it is absorbed into the root system of the plant.  People being lazy, greedy, bastards, farmers are no exception.  They found that using Roundup increased the yield of their crops and was a whole lot easier and cheaper to use.  So much so that researchers can find glyphosate in RAIN and in the air and of course our ground water and streams.  In 2009 the USDA says that farmers sprayed 57 million pounds of glyphosate on food crops.  That alone is reason to buy and eat organic.  Not convinced?  I’ll proceed.

Glyphosate

To be brief – glyphosate is a hormone-disrupting chemical.  It is linked to metabolic damage, infertility, obesity, learning disabilities and birth defects.  Need More?  Really?  If you are smugly thinking that you are a meat eater and don’t eat much corn, think again.  Most cattle are raised on CORN and that corn is Roundup ready.  Don’t believe me – take a trip to Nebraska.

In fact if you live in a corn growing state like Nebraska, you are drinking glyphosate in your household water unless you have a granular activated carbon filter to remove it.

We are eating Crap!

I’m not just being crude.  Human sewage sludge is used as fertilizer in farm fields.  Yes, that is a potential source of salmonella out breaks or worse.  I make this point because another huge problem is hormone-disrupting phthalates which are very common fragrance chemicals used in soaps and shampoos.  Phthalates are being found inside our produce and the only reasonable source is the sewage sludge.  EAT ORGANIC- the use of human sewage is banned in organic farming.

Fat and don’t know why?

May be you eat too much.  But maybe it is the pesticides that are making us fat.  Even in very low doses, pesticides tamper with our body’s natural weight loss chemistry.  These are also linked to cancer and type 2 diabetes, go figure.

The nice thing is that eating organic for just five days can rid the body of virtually all pesticide residues.

What to avoid?

Avoid synthetic fragrances, soft vinyl products and “slow release” or gel-coated medications to eliminate phthalates.  And of course eat organic.

More reasons

Pesticides can interfere with your vitamin D levels.  Organophosphates are a class of pesticides that include 20 or more different pesticides and account for more than 70 percent of the pesticides used in the US.  It is known that these pesticides interfere with the body’s ability to metabolize vitamin D.  D, known as the sunshine vitamin protects us from cancer, diabetes, infections, heart desease, broken bones and boosts our immune system.

Feed Lot Farming – now this is a story in its own right, but hopefully you’ll read it anyhow.  Feed lots are a farming method to raise a large number of cattle or fowl in a small space.  The animals are herded into tightly packed pens or corals.  They are fed in situations that force the animals to eat their own feces.  These “Lots” are so filthy the farmers inject low levels of antibiotics into the animals to keep them health, which in turn end up in the meat we eat and cause antibiotic resistance in humans.  All mass produced animals including cows, chickens, turkeys, pigs, dairy cattle and sheep are raised this way.  In such conditions pests can also be a problem, so farmers spray the herd or flock with pesticides which also get into their food.

Conditions are so bad that e.coil bacteria is a problem, so to prevent it from getting into the food supply, after slaughter, one method is to wash chickens in a chlorine bath that contains 30 times more chlorine than a swimming pool.  To mask the chlorine odor and supposedly to keep the bird moist while cooking, the chickens are then injected with a solution of water and phosphate.  Phosphate can increase our risk of kidney disease, weak bones and even cause premature aging.

Need more reasons?

You are beyond hope – it was nice knowing you – jughandle