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Category Archive for: ‘Glycemic Index’
Kid Safe Alert: Sunny D

This blog is dedicated to helping you make the wise, healthy food choices.  With that in mind, Jughandle’s Fat Farm can not recommend Sunny D made by Procter & Gamble for either you or your children.

Read the Label

The two major ingredients are water and corn syrup.  Less than 2 percent is concentrated fruit juice.  The rest is artificial colors, sweeteners, canola oil and sodium hexametaphosphated.

Miss leading health claims

The label says 100% vitamin C.  That alone is NOT health.  Many vegetables and fruits contain 100 percent of your daily allotment of vitamin C in a single serving.

 

FoodFacts.com

Sunny D receives a very low 14 score on Foodfacts.com health index.

Sunny D contains:

MSG, corn, flavorings and other controversial additives including colorants.

Ingredients:

Icon

WaterCorn Syrup High Fructose Contains 2% or less of the Following: ( Juice(s) Concentrates (Orange(s),TangerinesApple(s)LimeGrapefruit), Citric Acid,Ascorbic AcidThiamin Hydrochloride (Vitamin B1),Flavor(s) NaturalCorn Starch ModifiedCanola Oil,Sodium CitrateCellulose GumXanthan GumSodium HexametaphosphateSodium BenzoateYellow 5,Yellow 6

Nutrition Facts

  • Serving Size 8 oz
  • Servings Per Container 16
  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories 120Calories from Fat 0
  • % Daily Value*
  • Total Fat 0g0%
  • Saturated Fat 0g0%
  • Trans Fat 0g
  • Cholesterol 0mg0%
  • Sodium 190mg8%
  • Total Carbohydrate 29g10%
  • Dietary Fiber 0g0%
  • Sugars 27g
  • Protein 0g
  • C100%
  • THIAMIN15%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Weight Watcher’s Winning Points®**: 2
Weight Watcher’s PointsPlus®**: 3
** Weight Watchers® and Points® are registered trademarks of Weight Watchers International, Inc. The number of Points provided here were calculated by Food Facts, Inc. based on published Weight Watchers International, Inc. information and do not imply sponsorship or endorsement of such number of Points, Food Facts, Inc., or the above product by Weight Watchers International, Inc.
Cheese

I’ve been putting off writing about cheese because I’ve been afraid of what I might find.  Its been 65 days since I started on my Plant-based diet and I’ve found that I’m not so much missing eating meat but I am eating more cheese.  I know that eventually I’ll need to remove dairy from my diet to accomplish my goal of cleaning my arteries but cheese provides so much to a dish that you can’t get any other way, that I’m afraid the cravings might start.

For those who just have to know about the most expensive stuff in the world. I must admit it is interesting to see what people will pay the big bucks for.  The featured picture is a picture of deer milk cheese.  It is only $500/lb, but the most expensive cheese in the world is Pule cheese, made from donkey milk.  It sells for $616/lb. -pictured below.

 

History

Cheese is around 4000 years old on this planet.  It is made from the milk of all animals but you’ll find it mostly made from cow milk.  There are easily over 700 different popular cheeses in the world.  Cheese can be found hard, semi-hard, semi-soft and soft.  Most cheese is classified as vegetarian, but not vegan.

Serving and Storage Tips 

from Cheese.com

  • Unpasteurized cheese with a range of flavours should not be sliced until purchase otherwise it will start to lose its subtlety and aroma.
  • Keep the cheese in conditions in which it matures. Hard, semi-hard and semi-soft cheeses are stored in the temperatures from around 8 – 13 C.
  • Keep the cheese wrapped in the waxed paper and place it in a loose-fitting food-bag not to lose humidity and maintain the circulation of air.
  • Wrap blue cheeses all over as mould spores spread readily not only to other cheeses but also to everything near.
  • Chilled cheeses should be taken out of the refrigerator one and a half or two hours before serving.
  • Cheeses contain living organisms that must not be cut off from air, yet it is important not to let a cheese dry out.
  • Do not store cheese with other strong-smelling foods. As a cheese breathes it will absorb other aromas and may spoil.
  • Wrap soft cheeses loosely. Use waxed or greaseproof paper rather than cling film.
  • Let cold cheese warm up for about half an hour before eating to allow the flavour and aroma to develop.

Nutritional Facts

This is the part I’ve been afraid of.  Lets take cheddar cheese as an example.

Cheddar cheese is very low on the Glycemic index.  It has a load factor of 1 on a scale of 0 to 250, which means that it releases its energy into the blood stream on a slow, long term basis.  Cheddar is also very low on the inflammation scale with a -120.

That was the good.  The bad is that one ounce of cheddar cheese provides 113 calories, 92 of which are from fat and of the 9 grams of total fat, 6 grams are saturated fat.  Worse than that is 10% of your daily intake of cholesterol will be in that one once of cheese (29 mg).

Cheddar does have 7 grams of protein per ounce and 20% of your daily calcium needs for a 2000 calorie diet.

Parmesan cheese – To show you the difference between hard cheese and even a semi-hard cheese like cheddar, lets look at parmesan which is one of the hardest cheeses.

The good is that Parmesan rates a “0” on the Glycemic load chart and a -7 on the Inflammation chart.  It also contains a lot of phosphorus and calcium, as well as 10 grams of protein.  But…

The bad isn’t quite as bad as with cheddar.  Only 110 calories per ounce of which 64 are fat.  It contains 7 grams of fat of which 5 grams are saturated.  It only has 19 mg of cholesterol but a whopping 449 mg of sodium.

Lets look at one more standard cheese.  Cottage cheese, which is considered a soft cheese.  Cottage cheese ranks a 1 on the Glycemic load chart and a -6 on the Inflammation chart.
Cottage cheese only has 27 calories per ounce, 11 of which are from fat.  The good news is that less than 2% is saturated fat and only 1 gram of total fat.  It does have 5 mg of cholesterol and 102 mg of sodium.

Conclusions

Be your own judge, but by what I’ve found here, it looks like cheese will not be in my future.  If I find a miraculous cheese that you just can’t live with out, I’ll let you know.  Until then, I’m a little depressed, – jughandle

Rice and How to Cook it

Wikipedia says

“Rice is the seed of the monocot plants Oryza sativa or Oryza glaberrima. As a cereal grain, it is the most important staple food for a large part of the world’s human population, especially in East and South Asia, the Middle East, Latin America, and the West Indies. It is the grain with the second-highest worldwide production, after maize (corn).

We are more interested in how we can prepare it and what nutritional value it has for us.  The most common type of rice in the US is white long-grain.

100g or 3.5 oz of raw rice has

Calories – 365

Carbohydrates – 80 g

Sugars – .12 g

Fiber – 1.3 g

Fat – .66 g

Protein – 7.13

 

GI of boiled long grain white rice – 64 where 0-55 is low, 56-69 is med and over 70 is high

Serving size is 1 cup = 36 g of carbs

GL per serving is 23 where 0-10 is low, 11-19 is med and over 20 is high maxing out around 60

How To Cook Rice

Most rice can be cooked by boiling 1 cup of rice in 2 cups of water for around 20 minutes.   The way I prefer is to use a rice cooker.  The following is a video of Jamie Oliver showing you how to cook rice.

 

The Glycemic Index and Load

 

We on the Fat Farm are interested in eating well but eating things that will keep our blood sugar in the 60-80 mg/dl range. That is the concentration of milligrams of glucose  in deciliters of our blood.  Rice is all over the Glycemic Index depending on which type you choice.  Before I get into the index values of the various rice types, I want to confuse you some more.

The GI compares foods at the same carbohydrate level, rating their ability to raise your blood sugar, with glucose being 100. This is the Quality of the food.  Since different foods contain various amounts of carbohydrates we need an index that shows the blood sugar effect by volume.  That is the Glycemic Load indicator. The GL measures the Quantity of carbohydrate in a food.  The GL is a much more accurate measurement of the effect of the food on our blood sugar.  The glycemic load of a food is calculated by multiplying the glycemic index by the amount of carbohydrate in grams provided by a food and dividing the total by 100.

Neither the GI nor the GL are easy concepts to grasp, but for the health of our pancreas it is important that we try.

Notice in the list below that Jasmine Rice has a higher GI rating than Glucose itself.  That means that Jasmine Rice will spike your blood sugar very quickly.

 

 Types of Rice and Their Loads

There are literally hundreds of different kinds of rice and most even very by country.  Here are a couple to contemplate.

Type
white Rice
Brown Rice
Basmati Rice
Jasmine Rice
GI
64
55
58
109
Serving Size
1 cup
1 cup
1 cup
1 cup
Carbs/serving
36
33
38
GL/Serving
23
18
22
46

To sum it up – Brown rice good, white long grain rice OK, Jasmine rice Bad.

Farm On You Fat Farmers.  Let me know if you have any questions – Jughandle

A Reversal on Carbs

Article from the LA Times:

A reversal on carbs

Fat was once the devil. Now more nutritionists are pointing accusingly at sugar and refined grains.

By Marni Jameson, Special to the Los Angeles Times

December 20, 2010

Most people can count calories. Many have a clue about where fat lurks in their diets. However, fewer give carbohydrates much thought, or know why they should.

But a growing number of top nutritional scientists blame excessive carbohydrates — not fat — for America’s ills. They say cutting carbohydrates is the key to reversing obesity, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and hypertension.

“Fat is not the problem,” says Dr. Walter Willett, chairman of the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health. “If Americans could eliminate sugary beverages, potatoes, white bread, pasta, white rice and sugary snacks, we would wipe out almost all the problems we have with weight and diabetes and other metabolic diseases.”

It’s a confusing message. For years we’ve been fed the line that eating fat would make us fat and lead to chronic illnesses. “Dietary fat used to be public enemy No. 1,” says Dr. Edward Saltzman, associate professor of nutrition and medicine at Tufts University. “Now a growing and convincing body of science is pointing the finger at carbs, especially those containing refined flour and sugar.”

Americans, on average, eat 250 to 300 grams of carbs a day, accounting for about 55% of their caloric intake. The most conservative recommendations say they should eat half that amount. Consumption of carbohydrates has increased over the years with the help of a 30-year-old, government-mandated message to cut fat.

And the nation’s levels of obesity, Type 2 diabetes and heart disease have risen. “The country’s big low-fat message backfired,” says Dr. Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. “The overemphasis on reducing fat caused the consumption of carbohydrates and sugar in our diets to soar. That shift may be linked to the biggest health problems in America today.”

To understand what’s behind the upheaval takes some basic understanding of food and metabolism.

All carbohydrates (a category including sugars) convert to sugar in the blood, and the more refined the carbs are, the quicker the conversion goes. When you eat a glazed doughnut or a serving of mashed potatoes, it turns into blood sugar very quickly. To manage the blood sugar, the pancreas produces insulin, which moves sugar into cells, where it’s stored as fuel in the form of glycogen.

If you have a perfectly healthy metabolism, the system works beautifully, says Dr. Stephen Phinney, a nutritional biochemist and an emeritus professor of UC Davis who has studied carbohydrates for 30 years. “However, over time, as our bodies get tired of processing high loads of carbs, which evolution didn’t prepare us for … how the body responds to insulin can change,” he says.

When cells become more resistant to those insulin instructions, the pancreas needs to make more insulin to push the same amount of glucose into cells. As people become insulin resistant, carbs become a bigger challenge for the body. When the pancreas gets exhausted and can’t produce enough insulin to keep up with the glucose in the blood, diabetes develops.

The first sign of insulin resistance is a condition called metabolic syndrome — a red flag that diabetes, and possibly heart disease, is just around the corner. People are said to have the syndrome when they have three or more of the following: high blood triglycerides (more than 150 mg); high blood pressure (over 135/85); central obesity (a waist circumference in men of more than 40 inches and in women, more than 35 inches); low HDL cholesterol (under 40 in men, under 50 in women); or elevated fasting glucose.

About one-fourth of adults has three or more of these symptoms.

“Put these people on a low-carb diet and they’ll not only lose weight, which always helps these conditions, but their blood levels will improve,” Phinney says. In a 12-week study published in 2008, Phinney and his colleagues put 40 overweight or obese men and women with metabolic syndrome on a 1,500-calorie diet. Half went on a low-fat, high-carb diet. The others went on a low-carb, high-fat diet. The low-fat group consumed 12 grams of saturated fat a day out of a total of 40 grams of fat, while the low-carb group ate 36 grams of saturated fat a day — three times more — out of a total of 100 grams of fat.

Despite all the extra saturated fat the low-carb group was getting, at the end of the 12 weeks, levels of triglycerides (which are risk factors for heart disease) had dropped by 50% in this group. Levels of good HDL cholesterol increased by 15%.

In the low-fat, high-carb group, triglycerides dropped only 20% and there was no change in HDL.

The take-home message from this study and others like it is that — contrary to what many expect — dietary fat intake is not directly related to blood fat. Rather, the amount of carbohydrates in the diet appears to be a potent contributor.

“The good news,” adds Willett, “is that based on what we know, almost everyone can avoid Type 2 diabetes. Avoiding unhealthy carbohydrates is an important part of that solution.” For those who are newly diagnosed, he adds, a low-carb diet can take the load off the pancreas before it gets too damaged and improve the condition — reducing or averting the need for insulin or other diabetes meds.

Americans can also blame high-carb diets for why the population has gotten fatter over the last 30 years, says Phinney, who is co-author of “The New Atkins for a New You” (Simon & Schuster, 2010).

“Carbohydrates are a metabolic bully,” Phinney says. “They cut in front of fat as a fuel source and insist on being burned first. What isn’t burned gets stored as fat, and doesn’t come out of storage as long as carbs are available. And in the average American diet, they always are.”

Here’s how Phinney explains it: When you cut carbs, your body first uses available glycogen as fuel. When that’s gone, the body turns to fat and the pancreas gets a break. Blood sugar stabilizes, insulin levels drop, fat burns. That’s why the diet works for diabetics and for weight loss.

When the body switches to burning fat instead of glycogen, it goes into a process called nutritional ketosis. If a person eats 50 or fewer grams of carbs, his body will go there, Phinney says. (Nutritional ketosis isn’t to be confused with ketoacidosis, a dangerous condition that can occur in diabetics.)

Beyond the fat-burning effects of ketosis, people lose weight on low-carb diets because fat and protein increase satisfaction and reduce appetite. On the flip side, simple carbs cause an insulin surge, which triggers a blood sugar drop, which makes you hungry again.

“At my obesity clinic, my default diet for treating obesity, Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome is a low-carb diet,” says Dr. Eric Westman, director of the Lifestyle Medicine Clinic at Duke University Medical Center, and co-author of the new Atkins book. “If you take carbohydrates away, all these things get better.”

Though the movement to cap carbs is growing, not all nutritional scientists have fully embraced it. Dr. Ronald Krauss, senior scientist at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute and founder and past chair of the American Heart Assn.’s Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism, says that while he fundamentally agrees with those advocating fewer dietary carbs, he doesn’t like to demonize one food group.

That said, he adds, those who eat too many calories tend to overconsume carbohydrates, particularly refined carbohydrates and sugars. “It can be extremely valuable to limit carbohydrate intake and substitute protein and fat. I am glad to see so many people in the medical community getting on board. But in general I don’t recommend extreme dietary measures for promoting health.”

Joanne Slavin, professor of nutrition at the University of Minnesota and a member of the advisory committee for the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, is less inclined to support the movement. The committee, she says, “looked at carbohydrates and health outcomes and did not find a relationship between carbohydrate intake and increased disease risk.”

Most Americans need to reduce calories and increase activity, Slavin adds. Cutting down on carbs as a calorie source is a good strategy, “but making a hit list of carbohydrate-containing foods is shortsighted and doomed to fail, similar to the low-fat rules that started in the 1980s.”

As nutrition scientists try to find the ideal for the future, others look to history and evolution for answers. One way to put our diet in perspective is to imagine the face of a clock with 24 hours on it. Each hour represents 100,000 years that humans have been on the Earth.

On this clock, the advent of agriculture and refined grains would have appeared at about 11:54 p.m. (23 hours and 54 minutes into the day). Before that, humans were hunters and gatherers, eating animals and plants off the land. Agriculture allowed for the mass production of crops such as wheat and corn, and refineries transformed whole grains into refined flour and created processed sugar.

Some, like Phinney, would argue that we haven’t evolved to adapt to a diet of refined foods and mass agriculture — and that maybe we shouldn’t try.

health@latimes.com

 

 

 

 

Cleaning up your carb act: Where to begin

latimes.com

Here is expert advice on how many and what kinds of carbs you should be eating each day.

By Marni Jameson, Special to the Los Angeles Times

December 20, 2010

Most Americans eat between 250 and 300 grams of carbohydrates a day, the equivalent of 1,000 to 1,200 calories. The Institute of Medicine, which sets dietary nutrient requirements, recommends 130 grams a day. Some, such as Dr. Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, say achieving that would be a big step in the right direction, but other low-carb advocates believe the number is too inflexible.

“What people can tolerate varies widely based on age, metabolism, activity level, body size and gender,” says Dr. Stephen Phinney, nutritional biochemist and an emeritus professor of UC Davis. For healthy adults the number can be higher, he says, while others will feel and function better if they stay between 50 and 100 grams a day. “I’ve seen some people get in trouble when they eat over 25 grams.”

If you’re lean and active, you can tolerate a higher carb intake than if you’re fat and sedentary, says Dr. Walter Willett, chairman of the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health. But genetic predisposition, he adds, will also play a role.

Good carb or bad? How to choose wisely

Food scientists divide carbohydrates into two categories: good and bad. A good carb is one that doesn’t raise your blood sugar quickly. (Some people call these complex carbs.) Examples are whole grains, brown rice and legumes. Bad, or simple, carbs trigger a fast rise in blood sugar. Some examples are white bread, refined pasta, processed cereals, cookies, candy and sugary sodas.

When evaluating carbs, look at both the fiber content — it should be high — and glycemic index, which should be low, says Dr. Walter Willett of the Harvard School of Public Health.

One rule to use when buying bread (the words “whole grain” on a package can often mislead) is the 6 to 1 rule, he says: Look for a ratio of 6 grams of carbs to 1 gram of fiber to determine whether the product is truly whole grain. An example: If the bread has 24 grams of carbs per serving and 4 grams of fiber, the ratio is 6 to 1 — that’s good. If it has 44 grams of carbs and 2 grams of fiber, it’s 22 to 1 — not so good.

The glycemic index ranks food on a scale of 1 to 100 based on a measure of how fast blood sugar rises after a food is consumed. Foods with a glycemic index below 55 are considered low glycemic.

As a general rule, the more processed a food, the higher the glycemic levels and the lower the fiber levels. In addition, when flour gets refined, many minerals and vitamins get lost or depleted along with the fiber.

Unfortunately, the vast majority of carbs that Americans eat are the bad kind. In the typical American diet, 55% of calories come from carbohydrates, according to Dr. Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. More specifically, Hu says, the carb breakdown in our daily diet goes like this:

Sugary sodas, sweet beverages and fruit juice: 10% of total calories.

Refined starches, including white bread, cakes, bagels, cookies and muffins: 20% to 25%

Potatoes, white rice, tortillas and refined-grain cereals: 10% to 15%

Healthful sources, including nonstarchy vegetables, whole grains and legumes: 5% to 10%.

‘Net’ is key when counting

Counting carbs is easier than counting calories, if you know where to look. Start by being aware of what foods are naturally high in carbs. Those include anything with flour and sugar, starchy vegetables (corn, peas and potatoes), rice, pasta, cereals and sweets. You can find carb counters online and tables in low-carb diet books.

On packaged foods, look at labels. Then you’ll want to calculate “net carbs,” the number that counts. First find the total grams of carbohydrates per serving, then subtract grams of fiber and sugar alcohols. For example, if one serving of canned beans has 18 grams of carbohydrates and 6 grams of fiber, net carbs equal 12 grams.

Why do this? Fiber is a nondigestible carbohydrate, so it’s not absorbed by the body. Sugar alcohols, found in certain foods labeled “sugar-free” — including gum, candies, cookies and some sodas — are lower in calories, absorbed only slowly and don’t affect blood sugar levels much.

Tips to help cut them from your diet

Many well-known diets, including the Zone diet and the South Beach diet, focus on cutting and counting carbs to varying degrees. The most famous is the Atkins diet, which starts with an induction phase, a very-low-carb diet of fewer than 20 grams daily, and ramps up the carb allotment later in the diet. Other low-carb diets are less strict. The Zone diet, also known as the 40-30-30 diet, is a calorically restricted diet that recommends that 40% of calories come from carbs, 30% from protein and 30% from healthful fats (ones from plants and fish). The South Beach diet more closely resembles the Atkins regimen but does not restrict carbohydrates as much in the early phase.

Whether you’re ready for a whole new way of eating or just want to cut back on carbs, here are some ways to do so:

Substitute sugar-free beverages for sugary soft drinks, sports drinks and juice.

Look for low-carb and sugar-free products in stores. Low-carb tortillas, bread, pasta and ice cream are in many grocery stores.

Instead of a starchy vegetable, such as potatoes, corn or rice, serve two green vegetables and a nonstarchy soup or salad.

Skip the bread basket at restaurants.

Have olives or cheese on high-fiber wafers as an appetizer.

Boost your intake of most green vegetables, nuts and berries.

At lunch, order an entree salad instead of a sandwich. Ask for your burger bunless, served on top of extra lettuce and tomato, with cheese.

Order your burrito naked and your tostada without the tortilla but with guacamole.

Add portions of fish, poultry, cheese, meat and eggs to your diet: These are virtually carb-free. Add peanut butter (the kind without added sugar), which is relatively low in carbs.

Get a low-carb cookbook or search for low-carb recipes online.

What the nutrition experts say

Dr. Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health:

“Almost everyone could improve his or her health by cutting back and paying more attention to carbs. Reduce refined carbs in the diet and replace them with lean protein, whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes and fats from vegetable sources. Reduce the overall amount of carbs from 55% of calories to below 40%, and make as many of those good carbs as you can.”

Dr. Ronald Krauss, senior scientist at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute and founder and past chair of the American Heart Assn. Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism:

“Avoid white starches, sugars and trans fat; look for whole kernel (not just whole wheat) grain products; load up on vegetables, limit red meats (especially processed); and don’t agonize about saturated fat. Even better, burn up calories by getting plenty of exercise; then you won’t have to worry as much about choosing between fats and carbs.”

Dr. Stephen Phinney, nutritional biochemist and emeritus professor of medicine at UC Davis:

“A person’s carbohydrate intake should match his tolerance. In my case, since I am carbohydrate intolerant, I eat less than 50 grams of net carbs a day from vegetables, berries and fermented dairy, including sour yogurt, cheese and buttermilk. I’d rather eat a diet higher in fat, rich in protein and lower in carbs than take two drugs a day with side effects, which I used to have to do to control my blood pressure.”

Dr. Edward Saltzman, associate professor of nutrition and medicine at Tufts University:

“A very-low-carb diet is likely healthier for the long term, but it’s difficult to consume given the food environment in which we live. I’ve never recommended a very-low-carbohydrate diet, one under 20 grams a day, for my patients, though I have suggested patients stay between 100 to 120 grams. You can eat a lot of vegetables, lean meat and some dairy and have a healthy diet not high in carbs.”

Joanne Slavin, professor of nutrition at the University of Minnesota, member of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee:

“Americans have to eat fewer calories. But I see no value in making a hit list for carbs. There are many healthy eating patterns, and potatoes, pasta, white bread and rice surely fit into many of these.”

Dr. Eric Westman, director of the Lifestyle Medicine Clinic at Duke University Medical Center:

“If we were to design a one-size-fits-all diet, it should probably be a low-carb diet. We should go back to the days of hunter-gatherers. The secret to maintaining a low-carb diet is to increase fat intake, but only natural fats, not man-made fats. I can keep patients on a low-carb diet forever if they can have cream, butter and bacon.”

Dr. Walter Willet, chairman of the department of nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health:

“Eating moderate carbohydrates can be healthy if they’re comprised of high fiber and whole grains. Personally, I avoid refined starches and sugars, and limit my carbohydrates to what I get from vegetables and whole grains. If I only eat healthy carbs, I feel so full, I really can’t consume more than 40% of my calories from carbs per day, so I tend to stay well under that.”

health@latimes.com

Copyright © 2011, Los Angeles Times

Jughandle says:  Thanks Darlene for that great article on Carbs, but some may be wondering how to keep up with all those numbers.   If you decide to do this low carb thing and want to stay healthy try

www.Sparkpeople.com  

and use their trackers to count anything you want.  Its free.