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Spring Cleaning

I know it is a touch early for Spring, but not to early to clean the toxins out of our systems and get ready for a healthy Spring and Summer, maybe with a detox diet.

 Start Properly

There are dozens of detox diets out there and some are down right bad for your kidneys and liver.  Be careful and use common sense, these diets are not for the faint of heart.  It is important to be prepared both mentally and physically for this diet.  Detox diets are not intended to cure disease, just to allow the body to run more efficiently, kind of like a car tune up.  If you have problems like high blood pressure, kidney disease or heart disease, consult your doctor before starting any diet.  Take the Detox Screening Quiz.

What the Mayo Clinic Says about Detox Diets

Detox diets: Do they work?

Do detox diets offer any health benefits?

Answer

from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D.

Detox, or detoxification, diets are popular, but they’re not scientifically proven.

Detox diets are touted as a way to remove toxins from the body. Specific detox diets vary — but typically a period of fasting is followed by a strict diet of raw vegetables, fruit and fruit juices, and water. In addition, some detox diets advocate using certain herbs and other supplements along with colon cleansing (enemas) to help empty the intestines. Most detox diets last seven to 10 days.

Some people report feeling more focused and energetic during and after detox diets. However, this may be due to a belief that they’re doing something good for their bodies. There’s little evidence that detox diets actually remove toxins from the body. Most ingested toxins are efficiently and effectively removed by the kidneys and liver and excreted in urine and stool.

It’s also important to consider possible side effects. Among other problems, detox diets can lead to:

  • Dehydration
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea

If you’re considering a detox diet, get the OK from your doctor first — and remember, the best diet is a healthy diet based on fruits and vegetables, whole grains and lean sources of protein.

What is a Detox Diet?

A detox diet is a good idea when you might have been over indulging in the wrong things for a period of time, or if you’d like to get a jump start on losing weight and/or are interested in getting the toxins and chemicals floating around in and on your body, out and off.  A good old detox can get rid of that bloated feeling and restore energy.  Your body will be able to accept more water and oxygen from the food you eat and your skin will look and feel better.  Detox diets generally last from 3 to 21 days.

Why Detox?

As I mentioned before, we ingest an amazing amount of chemicals, pesticides and hormones in the food we normally eat.  Even if you are trying to maintain a healthy life style, you are bound to have eaten some processed or canned food.  Been sick, having headaches, stomach problems, bloated,  had some drugs administered?  You need to detox.  Our bodies naturally remove toxins that we consume but a detox diet gives that body time to remove more toxins before we put more back in.

How to Start

As with most things, I recommend that you start slowly.  If you’ve never been on a detox diet before, start with a 3 day diet and see how it goes.

Juice fasts:

The Master Cleanse – Also know as the Lemonade diet. Nothing but lemonade, maple syrup and cayenne pepper – click here for details

Liquid Diets and Juice Fasting – Nothing but juice – click here for details

Raw Food Diet:

The 28 Day Raw Detox – Basically you can eat anything that isn’t cooked or processed.  click here for details

Conclusions and Recommendations

The Fat Farm does not recommend extreme diets of any kind.  If you must try these diets, start small and don’t go longer than a couple of days.  Here is a link to several more.  click here.

The Elephant In The Room
Big boy in the room

The elephant in the room

The elephant.  Ever been in a room full of people and everyone there knows they have a “big” something to talk about but no one wants to be “that guy” who first mentions “the Elephant in the Room”?

I have come to the point where I am both “that guy” and I am also “the Elephant in the Room”, quite literally.

Recent Past

I have been posting this blog for over 3 years.  My posts have been health and quality of life related for the most part.  I have tried not to be preachy, choosing to take the high road and “suggest” that we as a group or generation, or even society, are slowly killing ourselves with our food choices and dietary habits.  I’ve tried to locate alternative choices and explore diets ranging from vegan to the South Beach diet.  I have never asked you to do anything that I haven’t tried first.  I have dug deeply into any possible side effects or physical changes that might result from maintaining any type of diet.  I have shed light on food additives such as HFCS, flavor enhancers and color additives.  I told you that if you avoid these things you could not only live a healthier life but enjoy your remaining time on earth more.   Now it is time for me to pay the piper.

hospital photo

Condition

I am not going to labor on my various physical factors that may or may not have gotten me to the point of being the Elephant.  Doesn’t matter.  I am the result of what I have eaten and have not burned off over a period of years.  Yes I, as most people in the world, have challenges that make my path to a leaner me more difficult, but that only makes my choices more interesting.

human with head in sand ostrich with head in sand

Ostrich Inflicted People Stop Here

If you have the ostrich syndrome and have your head buried in the sand or even live on the Egyptian river De-Nile, Stop reading now.  BUT before you do, take off your clothes and stand in front of a mirror and ask your self  “self, is this the way I want to look for the rest of my life?

Elephant-Friend-1920x1080

Note To Friends and Family

If you are still reading then there might be hope for us yet.

I have to say that as I have been getting larger not a single person has given me grief about my weight.  Honestly, I don’t remember a single negative remark, which tells me three things.

  1.  Either I am such a mean SOB that people are afraid to make suggestions to me of that nature
  2. My friends and family don’t care about me.  (I know for a fact this one is not true, in fact I feel that they love me very much)
  3. My friends and family see a broken, fat, old, once at the top of his game, man and feel sorry for him.

Personally I’m pretty sure it is a combination of #1 and 3.

Not a single person in the world (correct me if I am wrong) looks in the mirror and can see the real image being projected.  I’m not sure why that is, but we all tend to see ourselves as we would like us to be, with a little fudge factor thrown in.

Please don’t read into this that I am blaming my friends and family for not telling me I was getting fat.  I don’t.  In fact I totally believe in taking full responsibility for, not only our own actions, but the results of our inaction.

The Piper To Pay

My piper weighed 308 lbs as of December 11, 2013.  Yep, that is one hell of a piper and he now has his hand out and wants to be paid!

elephand eating

Method

As a result of my 3 years of blogging about diets ranging from no meat, no carbs, no protein, no soda, no starches to all soup, all protein, all carbs, all water, and many variations in between, I have become completely convinced  that the diet that will work best for all of us is a balanced diet, mostly vegetables, avoiding additives, processed food and drinking lots of water.  Ever heard that before?  One thing I feel is very important to our digestive tract is to vary our diet.  This is important because our system can adjust to almost anything and in order to flush the toxins we take in we need to surprise our system with different food on a regular basis, lol.

poop

Keeping Track

So, all of that said, I will be eating any food I would like but in balanced amounts.  I will regulate and lose weight by limiting my intake to between 1890 and 2240 calories per day.  Of those calories, 50-60 percent will be carbohydrates, mostly complex carbs.  12-20 percent will be protein and 30 percent will be fat, mostly unsaturated fats.

I will use a free on line program to track my food, water and exercises called www.sparkpeople.com

elephant-painting-itself1

Goal – Stage 1

Sparkpeople has calculated, that for me to lose down to 250 lbs, my stage 1 goal by July 1, 2014, I need an in-take of between 1890 and 2240 calories per day.  That shouldn’t be hard.  If I crave things, I will eat them, but only under my limits.

Elephant-with ball

Join Me – or Not

This is for me.  Join me, I’d love it.  Tell me your problems, challenges, successes.  Or Not.  You can blow this off as another lame jughandle blog.  (then why are you reading this)

If you see me, make fun of me, congratulate me or ignore me.  Your choice.  A ride is always more fun with a companion.

I will post pictures and stories about things I discover.  It will be another adventure!

herd of elephants

Day 1 Results

Calories – 1097

Carbs – 146 g

Fat – 38 g

Protein – 41 g

8 oz glasses of water – 5

Weight gain or loss – Lost 3 #

Current weight of Piper – 305#

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bill Clinton – the Vegan

Yes, the former President of the United States is a vegan.  He once stuffed himself with barbecue, chicken enchiladas and he loved his hamburgers.  President Clinton like myself has a family history of heart disease.

Bill Clinton declares vegan victory

The former president, known for his love of burgers, barbecue and junk food, has gone from a meat lover to a vegan, the strictest form of a vegetarian diet. He says he eats fruits, vegetables and beans, but no red meat, chicken or dairy. continue

The Los Angeles Times

Bill Clinton talks about being a vegan

  • Former President Bill Clinton during a recent visit to Haiti. Clinton says that his vegan diet is improving his cardiovascular health.
Former President Bill Clinton during a recent visit to Haiti. Clinton says… (EPA / Andres Martinez Casares)
August 18, 2011|By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / continue reading

Bill Clinton a Vegan? Now we’ve heard everything

August 19th, 2011 from Healthy Living
Read the complete article

What is a typical vegan meal?

The following is a typical 2300 calorie vegan meal plan for 3 days from VeganHealth.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This diet is roughly 53% carbs 15% protein and 32% fat

Day 1

Breakfast 

  •  1 serving scrambled Tofu
  • Whole wheat bread – 2 slices
  • 2 medium wedges of cantaloup
  • 1 T margarine spread

Morning Snack

  • 6 oz cup of Soy yougurt
  • 2 T Flax seed

Lunch

  • 1.5 servings of Black Bean and sweet potato salad
  • 1 whole grapefruit

Afternoon Snack

  • 2 oz trail mix snack

Dinner

  • 1.5 cups of cooked quinoa
  • 1 serving of grilled vegetables
Evening Snack
  • 1 cup of fruit salad

Day 2

Breakfast 

  • 1 cup blueberries
  • 8 oz green tea
  • 1 cup Kashi breakfast pilaf
  • 4 T english walnuts
  • 1 cup of soymilk

Morning Snack

  • 1 medium apple
  • 1 T almond butter

Lunch

  • 1 orange
  • 2 cups raw lettuce
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes
  • 2 tsp flaxseed oil
  • 1 T balsamic wine vinegar dressing
  • 1 non-dairy burrito
  • 1 oz no salt sunflower seeds
Afternoon Snack
  • 4 T hummus
  • 8 medium baby carrots
  • 4 slices crisp rye bread

Dinner

  • 2 cups whole wheat spaghetti, cooked
  • 1/2 cup marinara sauce
  • 7 vegetarian meatballs
  • 1 cup broccoli, boiled with salt

Day 3

This day is 66% carbs 14% protein and 19% fat

Breakfast 

  •  1 cup vanilla soymilk
  • 1 medium banana
  • 1 cup raisin bran

Morning Snack

  • 2 medium wedges of cantaloupe
  • 5 whole wheat vegetable crackers, nonfat

Lunch

  • 1.5 servings of vegan chili
  • 1 serving dry salad
  • 1 piece of cornbread

Afternoon Snack

  • 6 oz of orange juice with calcium
  • 3 T mixed nuts

Dinner

  • 1.5 servings of brown rice and lentil pilaf
  • 1.5 servings of broccoli with garlic and olive oil

Conclusions

I conclude that we can make a better menu than that and I’m going to get a jump on next year by working the rest of this year on it.  Stay tuned Fat Farmers, this won’t be as hard as you might think (he said with a shaky voice) – jughandle

 

Year in Retrospect from a food standpoint

This has been an interesting year.  I’ve posted nearly 160 posts in 6 months averaging around 26 posts per month in addition to 60 of my favorite recipes.  The blog started in July and now has 72 subscribers averaging over 450 hits per week.  Personally, I’ve gone from a  morbidly obese meat eater to a obese Flexi-vegan.  I’ve learned that there are others out there that care about the quality of their food as I do.  I’ve identified the major problems with our eating and dieting as well as things to watch for in our food chain, food labeling and food additives. We’ve talked about nutrition and diets.  I’ve tried to pin point what to do and what not to do to the point of outlining what should be stocked in our pantries, refrigerators and freezers.

We’ve identified the problems, suggested solutions, provided direction on improving our techniques and offered some fool proof recipes. – NEXT

Next year

This coming year is 2012.  Amazing. 2011 was the worse year of my life in many ways.  2012 is going to be a rebirth, a revival of the economy, my business, my direction of my life and health and the way I approach living.  It’s time for a change.  I’m digging my heals in and I’m not looking back.  Will you join me?

Yes, I know it is easy to make end of the year promises and resolutions because traditionally that is what we all do.  Not this time.  I’m determined to continue to build on what we’ve started this year and create something even better.

We are going to expand on the recipes for vegetarian and vegan dishes.  I’m going to continue to research healthy food and food preparation.  In fact I’ve got a plan in the works to put together meals, menus and shopping lists, not just recipes.  Did you know that it is important to consider the foods we combine and eat together.  Our body receives food in different ways.  We need to eat in the right combinations.

Conclusions and Considerations

I’m concluding to try harder in 2012.  I’d like you to consider participating and offering suggestions and questions for me to find the answers to.  If you are enjoying the blog, please refer us to your friends.  If you have your own blog please link to the Farm and we’ll both build readership.  Don’t forget to use the Company Store to find the products you like at great prices with quick shipping through Amazon.  Thanks for following Jughandle’s Fat Farm – jug

Nov 1 marks 5 weeks of my Plant-based diet and counting

5 weeks

I told you that I’d weigh in on November 1 to let you know if eating a plant-based diet helps me lose weight as well as improves my health.  I just weighed in 14 pounds lighter than I was on September 27th when I started this thing.  14 pounds is no great feat, I’m well aware, but I haven’t intentionally tried to reduce my calorie intake.  All I’ve done differently is to not eat meat.  I’ve lost roughly 1/2 lb a day without trying.

Difficulty factor

On a scale from 1-10 with 10 being impossible to do, I’d say that for the first 3-4 weeks it was a difficulty factor of 3.   The last week I’ve been having cravings, mostly because I’m bored with the same old beans and greens.  Last week was a 7 on the scale.  I’m going to continue on my quest for clean arteries through the holiday season, which is going to be no mean feat because I’m going to be cooking for a family of meat eaters over Thanksgiving.  I’m going to feature a nice vegetable dish as the main course with side dishes of meat and fish as needed.  Of course I’ll cook a turkey for Thanksgiving more than likely.

Remember, I don’t have the greatest will power.  Because I’ve had cancer twice and have stared death in the eye, I truly believe that we shouldn’t put off enjoying living.  Life is short and the older you get the more you’ll realize just how short.  Enjoy yourself but don’t take unnecessary risks that might shorten your time on earth.  I don’t care if you believe in the “great void”, heaven, or reincarnation, you’ll only be in this body once, so make the best of it.

This is just an update so I won’t preach to you today.  More on reversing heart disease later in the week – jughandle

Vegan is not a Dirty Word

Do You Believe in God?

I know sometime in your life you’ve run into someone who told you they were, or are, a vegan.  The first time I heard that I replied, I’m a Christian, do you believe in God?  After a lengthy and somewhat embarrassing conversation, I learned that a vegan is some one who does not eat animals or animal products, such as eggs,cheese, butter and milk.  Actually a person who lives a vegan life is someone who chooses not to use any animal products in any way.  Yes, that means no leather belts, shoes, Hyde glue, et al.  People become vegan for many reasons, such as religion, personal beliefs and health.  For the purpose of this blog we will talk about only vegans as far as eating.  With the food supply in the condition it is in, it wouldn’t be a bad idea for we Fat Farmers to eat a more vegan leaning diet.

Natural Antioxidant

Fat Farm Changes

I have a good friend who recently told me about one of his children who has cancer.  Their family is starting to try and eat a vegan diet for health reasons.  I, for one, think this is a good idea if they can do it and I want the Fat Farm to help.  Look for a new tab on the menu bar that will list information about vegan diets.  In the recipe section, look in the vegan recipe section for meals that qualify as vegan.

Health Benefits of Eating Vegan

For you nay-sayers out there here are a few benefits of a vegan diet:

1. Cow and chicken farms that produce milk and eggs operate on a small profit margin.  In order to save money and increase production the cows, sick or not, are all fed antibiotics.  They are also fed hormones to increase production.  Chickens live in very small confined areas and their feed and living area are sprayed with pesticides, insecticides and herbicides to prevent insect infestations.  These chemicals are ingested by the animals and are absolutely stored in their body fat and transferred to their eggs and milk.  If you eat cheese, eggs and or the meat of cows or chickens that are raised in mass production you are also putting these same chemicals in your body.

2. Heart disease is strongly associated with cholesterol which is found for the most part in meat products and eggs.  Studies have shown that by replacing the saturated fat in meat products with unsaturated fats from vegetables lowers the risk of heart attack and death from heart disease in women by as much as 40%.

3. Eating vegan can reduce your risk of certain cancers, kidney and gallstones, diet-related diabetes, high blood pressure and health problems related to obesity.

4.  Eating animal fats has been linked to numerous health problems: heart disease, colon and lung cancer, osteoporosis, diabetes, kidney disease, hypertension and obesity.

5.  Excessive protein intake can lead to colon cancer and osteoporosis

6. Vegan and Vegetarian diets are high in fiber and nutrients and low in fat.  Iodine is best from plant products, selenium comes from Brazil nuts, vitiamn D2 from shitake mushroom and Omega-3 fatty acids from flax-seed oil.

I could go on and on to make my point, but if for some reason you don’t believe me, you can do your own research.  Let me know if I’m wrong. For a list of 57 health benefits of going vegan follow this link.

Down Side

There are down sides to eating vegan.  Some supplements are important to take in order to make sure you get all the vitamins and minerals our body needs.  After all, the human has evolved but is still an omnivore.  Most important is B-12 as well as the other B-complex vitamins.  It is also important to maintain the proper balance of iron, protein, zinc and calcium.  Yes, we can get iron and zinc from whole grains, nuts, seeds and legumes, but protein is found only in low levels.  Calcium is available in greens such as kale, mustard greens, and collard greens.

You will have to plan your meals more carefully, and of course the ultimate downside is having to explain to your host that you don’t eat meat and watch the expression on their face as panic ensues.

Nothing with a Face on it

Before you start telling people that you “don’t eat anything that had a face”, you should start small.  Let’s creep up on this vegan thing, Maybe even just supplement our normal eating with really good vegetable dishes.  I’ll get us started tomorrow.  Carnivores not to worry.  I will continue to post our favorite meat dishes.  Let’s just consider this vegan thing being open minded.

 

Keep on Farming you Fat Farmers – jug

Cleaning up your carb act: Where to begin

latimes.com

Here is expert advice on how many and what kinds of carbs you should be eating each day.

By Marni Jameson, Special to the Los Angeles Times

December 20, 2010

Most Americans eat between 250 and 300 grams of carbohydrates a day, the equivalent of 1,000 to 1,200 calories. The Institute of Medicine, which sets dietary nutrient requirements, recommends 130 grams a day. Some, such as Dr. Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, say achieving that would be a big step in the right direction, but other low-carb advocates believe the number is too inflexible.

“What people can tolerate varies widely based on age, metabolism, activity level, body size and gender,” says Dr. Stephen Phinney, nutritional biochemist and an emeritus professor of UC Davis. For healthy adults the number can be higher, he says, while others will feel and function better if they stay between 50 and 100 grams a day. “I’ve seen some people get in trouble when they eat over 25 grams.”

If you’re lean and active, you can tolerate a higher carb intake than if you’re fat and sedentary, says Dr. Walter Willett, chairman of the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health. But genetic predisposition, he adds, will also play a role.

Good carb or bad? How to choose wisely

Food scientists divide carbohydrates into two categories: good and bad. A good carb is one that doesn’t raise your blood sugar quickly. (Some people call these complex carbs.) Examples are whole grains, brown rice and legumes. Bad, or simple, carbs trigger a fast rise in blood sugar. Some examples are white bread, refined pasta, processed cereals, cookies, candy and sugary sodas.

When evaluating carbs, look at both the fiber content — it should be high — and glycemic index, which should be low, says Dr. Walter Willett of the Harvard School of Public Health.

One rule to use when buying bread (the words “whole grain” on a package can often mislead) is the 6 to 1 rule, he says: Look for a ratio of 6 grams of carbs to 1 gram of fiber to determine whether the product is truly whole grain. An example: If the bread has 24 grams of carbs per serving and 4 grams of fiber, the ratio is 6 to 1 — that’s good. If it has 44 grams of carbs and 2 grams of fiber, it’s 22 to 1 — not so good.

The glycemic index ranks food on a scale of 1 to 100 based on a measure of how fast blood sugar rises after a food is consumed. Foods with a glycemic index below 55 are considered low glycemic.

As a general rule, the more processed a food, the higher the glycemic levels and the lower the fiber levels. In addition, when flour gets refined, many minerals and vitamins get lost or depleted along with the fiber.

Unfortunately, the vast majority of carbs that Americans eat are the bad kind. In the typical American diet, 55% of calories come from carbohydrates, according to Dr. Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. More specifically, Hu says, the carb breakdown in our daily diet goes like this:

Sugary sodas, sweet beverages and fruit juice: 10% of total calories.

Refined starches, including white bread, cakes, bagels, cookies and muffins: 20% to 25%

Potatoes, white rice, tortillas and refined-grain cereals: 10% to 15%

Healthful sources, including nonstarchy vegetables, whole grains and legumes: 5% to 10%.

‘Net’ is key when counting

Counting carbs is easier than counting calories, if you know where to look. Start by being aware of what foods are naturally high in carbs. Those include anything with flour and sugar, starchy vegetables (corn, peas and potatoes), rice, pasta, cereals and sweets. You can find carb counters online and tables in low-carb diet books.

On packaged foods, look at labels. Then you’ll want to calculate “net carbs,” the number that counts. First find the total grams of carbohydrates per serving, then subtract grams of fiber and sugar alcohols. For example, if one serving of canned beans has 18 grams of carbohydrates and 6 grams of fiber, net carbs equal 12 grams.

Why do this? Fiber is a nondigestible carbohydrate, so it’s not absorbed by the body. Sugar alcohols, found in certain foods labeled “sugar-free” — including gum, candies, cookies and some sodas — are lower in calories, absorbed only slowly and don’t affect blood sugar levels much.

Tips to help cut them from your diet

Many well-known diets, including the Zone diet and the South Beach diet, focus on cutting and counting carbs to varying degrees. The most famous is the Atkins diet, which starts with an induction phase, a very-low-carb diet of fewer than 20 grams daily, and ramps up the carb allotment later in the diet. Other low-carb diets are less strict. The Zone diet, also known as the 40-30-30 diet, is a calorically restricted diet that recommends that 40% of calories come from carbs, 30% from protein and 30% from healthful fats (ones from plants and fish). The South Beach diet more closely resembles the Atkins regimen but does not restrict carbohydrates as much in the early phase.

Whether you’re ready for a whole new way of eating or just want to cut back on carbs, here are some ways to do so:

Substitute sugar-free beverages for sugary soft drinks, sports drinks and juice.

Look for low-carb and sugar-free products in stores. Low-carb tortillas, bread, pasta and ice cream are in many grocery stores.

Instead of a starchy vegetable, such as potatoes, corn or rice, serve two green vegetables and a nonstarchy soup or salad.

Skip the bread basket at restaurants.

Have olives or cheese on high-fiber wafers as an appetizer.

Boost your intake of most green vegetables, nuts and berries.

At lunch, order an entree salad instead of a sandwich. Ask for your burger bunless, served on top of extra lettuce and tomato, with cheese.

Order your burrito naked and your tostada without the tortilla but with guacamole.

Add portions of fish, poultry, cheese, meat and eggs to your diet: These are virtually carb-free. Add peanut butter (the kind without added sugar), which is relatively low in carbs.

Get a low-carb cookbook or search for low-carb recipes online.

What the nutrition experts say

Dr. Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health:

“Almost everyone could improve his or her health by cutting back and paying more attention to carbs. Reduce refined carbs in the diet and replace them with lean protein, whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes and fats from vegetable sources. Reduce the overall amount of carbs from 55% of calories to below 40%, and make as many of those good carbs as you can.”

Dr. Ronald Krauss, senior scientist at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute and founder and past chair of the American Heart Assn. Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism:

“Avoid white starches, sugars and trans fat; look for whole kernel (not just whole wheat) grain products; load up on vegetables, limit red meats (especially processed); and don’t agonize about saturated fat. Even better, burn up calories by getting plenty of exercise; then you won’t have to worry as much about choosing between fats and carbs.”

Dr. Stephen Phinney, nutritional biochemist and emeritus professor of medicine at UC Davis:

“A person’s carbohydrate intake should match his tolerance. In my case, since I am carbohydrate intolerant, I eat less than 50 grams of net carbs a day from vegetables, berries and fermented dairy, including sour yogurt, cheese and buttermilk. I’d rather eat a diet higher in fat, rich in protein and lower in carbs than take two drugs a day with side effects, which I used to have to do to control my blood pressure.”

Dr. Edward Saltzman, associate professor of nutrition and medicine at Tufts University:

“A very-low-carb diet is likely healthier for the long term, but it’s difficult to consume given the food environment in which we live. I’ve never recommended a very-low-carbohydrate diet, one under 20 grams a day, for my patients, though I have suggested patients stay between 100 to 120 grams. You can eat a lot of vegetables, lean meat and some dairy and have a healthy diet not high in carbs.”

Joanne Slavin, professor of nutrition at the University of Minnesota, member of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee:

“Americans have to eat fewer calories. But I see no value in making a hit list for carbs. There are many healthy eating patterns, and potatoes, pasta, white bread and rice surely fit into many of these.”

Dr. Eric Westman, director of the Lifestyle Medicine Clinic at Duke University Medical Center:

“If we were to design a one-size-fits-all diet, it should probably be a low-carb diet. We should go back to the days of hunter-gatherers. The secret to maintaining a low-carb diet is to increase fat intake, but only natural fats, not man-made fats. I can keep patients on a low-carb diet forever if they can have cream, butter and bacon.”

Dr. Walter Willet, chairman of the department of nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health:

“Eating moderate carbohydrates can be healthy if they’re comprised of high fiber and whole grains. Personally, I avoid refined starches and sugars, and limit my carbohydrates to what I get from vegetables and whole grains. If I only eat healthy carbs, I feel so full, I really can’t consume more than 40% of my calories from carbs per day, so I tend to stay well under that.”

health@latimes.com

Copyright © 2011, Los Angeles Times

Jughandle says:  Thanks Darlene for that great article on Carbs, but some may be wondering how to keep up with all those numbers.   If you decide to do this low carb thing and want to stay healthy try

www.Sparkpeople.com  

and use their trackers to count anything you want.  Its free.

 

 

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