Tag Archive for: ‘Nutrition’
Diets or “A diet that makes sense”

I think we’ve discussed before that weird diets don’t work. Sure, you might lose 10 or 15 lbs on the cabbage diet, then wham, a plateau and you’re stuck. That’s because your body adjusts to your new calorie intake and if it is too low your body shifts into “starvation” mode to keep you from starving to death and you lower your metabolism making you feel crappy and depressed because you aren’t losing weight. You need a diet that makes sense.


Most diets deprive you of something you need to be healthy. That’s why you can’t binge diet. To be healthy you need to:


Drink 80 to 120 oz of water per day

Yes, you can get water from coffee, tea, coke zero, etc, etc, but those other drinks add toxins and sugar that your system will need to fight to eliminate. Drink water. Actually, better yet, drink water with lemon in it. As much lemon as you want, just no sugar. Lemon in your water helps to neutralize your pH because even though lemon juice is acidic it is processed by the body making it a base.

Eat a diverse, well balanced diet 

We’ve heard that line all our lives, but what does that mean?  It means that you should have a protein at every meal.  Eat different proteins, mix it up.  Eat beef or pork for breakfast, chicken for lunch or fish for diner.  Don’t stop there.  Try new stuff.  Eat lots of vegetables.  All colors of vegetables.

Lots of fruit too.  Try eating vegetables or fruit for snacks.  You can almost eat a much as you can hold.  But its important to lower your desire to stuff your self to the gills.  You do that by not eating sugar or carbohydrates high on the GI scale.

Remember, sugar begets more sugar.  Yes, you do need carbs, but make sure they are complex carbohydrates, allowing your body to convert them to energy over a longer time, using more of the energy instead of storing it as fat.  That brings up the “f” word, Fat.  Don’t fear fat.  Eat natural butter, not margarine.  Eat lean meat but don’t worry about that too much.  Eat and use olive oil in cooking and salad dressings.  You get the drift.  We’ll talk more about it as time goes by.

Exercise when you can

Do what you can to exercise.  Take the stairs, walk the dog, etc. Exercise not only burns calories but also raises your metabolism making your body burn more calories even at rest.

Eat healthy foods

Most importantly, when you put something into your body, make sure it’s good for you.  Read the label, if you don’t know what the ingredient is don’t eat it.  Try to make your own food.  Don’t eat out as much.  If you eat packaged or processed food, don’t eat anything that has more than 5 ingredients on the label.

If you drink alcohol

Try to reduce your intake and drink more red wine than any thing else.  If you normally have a drink or two a night, don’t drink on Wednesdays for a couple of months.  You’ll be surprised at the difference.

It used to be thought that alcohol was treated by the body as a carbohydrate.  It isn’t.  When you take a drink, your body gives priority to metabolizing the alcohol first.  So alcohol is really treated like a fat in the body.

“This is because alcohol is oxidised by the body in preference to fat, thus ‘saving’ fat for storage. Therefore, alcohol affects the diet in the same way as an increase in the percentage of fat eaten. This is something to remember in your weight loss quest.” – BYC


In Conclusion

So, if you do all five of the things above and you still aren’t losing weight, the only thing left is portion control.  You are now healthy, just not at your ideal weight because of the stored calories in your past.

You only have one option:

1. eat fewer calories than you burn

But you can do that in two ways:

1. eat less

2. exercise more

Here at the Fat Farm we consider these suggestions as a diet that makes sense and recommend tracking your caloric intake at

Their online tracking method will tell you the number of calories you need and even calculate the nutrition for you. If you are diabetic they will track your glucose readings among other things.  Ask me how I use it to keep my recipes and normally eaten (grouped) foods charted.


Later – Jughandle

Year in Retrospect from a food standpoint

This has been an interesting year.  I’ve posted nearly 160 posts in 6 months averaging around 26 posts per month in addition to 60 of my favorite recipes.  The blog started in July and now has 72 subscribers averaging over 450 hits per week.  Personally, I’ve gone from a  morbidly obese meat eater to a obese Flexi-vegan.  I’ve learned that there are others out there that care about the quality of their food as I do.  I’ve identified the major problems with our eating and dieting as well as things to watch for in our food chain, food labeling and food additives. We’ve talked about nutrition and diets.  I’ve tried to pin point what to do and what not to do to the point of outlining what should be stocked in our pantries, refrigerators and freezers.

We’ve identified the problems, suggested solutions, provided direction on improving our techniques and offered some fool proof recipes. – NEXT

Next year

This coming year is 2012.  Amazing. 2011 was the worse year of my life in many ways.  2012 is going to be a rebirth, a revival of the economy, my business, my direction of my life and health and the way I approach living.  It’s time for a change.  I’m digging my heals in and I’m not looking back.  Will you join me?

Yes, I know it is easy to make end of the year promises and resolutions because traditionally that is what we all do.  Not this time.  I’m determined to continue to build on what we’ve started this year and create something even better.

We are going to expand on the recipes for vegetarian and vegan dishes.  I’m going to continue to research healthy food and food preparation.  In fact I’ve got a plan in the works to put together meals, menus and shopping lists, not just recipes.  Did you know that it is important to consider the foods we combine and eat together.  Our body receives food in different ways.  We need to eat in the right combinations.

Conclusions and Considerations

I’m concluding to try harder in 2012.  I’d like you to consider participating and offering suggestions and questions for me to find the answers to.  If you are enjoying the blog, please refer us to your friends.  If you have your own blog please link to the Farm and we’ll both build readership.  Don’t forget to use the Company Store to find the products you like at great prices with quick shipping through Amazon.  Thanks for following Jughandle’s Fat Farm – jug

Fiber – Nature’s broom

If you ask most anybody they will tell you that we should eat more fiber and that fiber is “nature’s broom”.  But do you really know what that means?  And how much is more fiber?

I want to tell you at the beginning of this post while you are still paying attention that if you eat more fiber you MUST drink more fluids, preferably water.  If you don’t it will back up and create a plug you won’t enjoy. – Jughandle

From the Mayo Clinic:

High-fiber foods

By Mayo Clinic staff

Looking to add more fiber to your diet? Fiber — along with adequate fluid intake — moves quickly and relatively easily through your digestive tract and helps it function properly. A high-fiber diet may also help reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes. (jughandle adds – as well as colon cancer)

Here’s a look at the fiber content of some common foods. Read nutrition labels to find out exactly how much fiber is in your favorite foods. Women should try to eat at least 21 to 25 grams of fiber a day, while men should aim for 30 to 38 grams a day.

Fruits Serving size Total fiber (grams)*
Raspberries 1 cup 8.0
Pear, with skin 1 medium 5.5
Apple, with skin 1 medium 4.4
Strawberries (halves) 1 1/4 cup 3.8
Banana 1 medium 3.1
Orange 1 medium 3.1
Figs, dried 2 medium 1.6
Raisins 2 tablespoons 1.0
Grains, cereal & pasta Serving size Total fiber (grams)*
Spaghetti, whole-wheat, cooked 1 cup 6.2
Barley, pearled, cooked 1 cup 6.0
Bran flakes 3/4 cup 5.3
Oat bran muffin 1 medium 5.2
Oatmeal, quick, regular or instant, cooked 1 cup 4.0
Popcorn, air-popped 3 cups 3.5
Brown rice, cooked 1 cup 3.5
Bread, rye 1 slice 1.9
Bread, whole-wheat or multigrain 1 slice 1.9
Legumes, nuts & seeds Serving size Total fiber (grams)*
Split peas, cooked 1 cup 16.3
Lentils, cooked 1 cup 15.6
Black beans, cooked 1 cup 15.0
Lima beans, cooked 1 cup 13.2
Baked beans, vegetarian, canned, cooked 1 cup 10.4
Sunflower seed kernels 1/4 cup 3.9
Almonds 1 ounce (23 nuts) 3.5
Pistachio nuts 1 ounce (49 nuts) 2.9
Pecans 1 ounce (19 halves) 2.7
Vegetables Serving size Total fiber (grams)*
Artichoke, cooked 1 medium 10.3
Peas, cooked 1 cup 8.8
Broccoli, boiled 1 cup 5.1
Turnip greens, boiled 1 cup 5.0
Sweet corn, cooked 1 cup 4.2
Brussels sprouts, cooked 1 cup 4.1
Potato, with skin, baked 1 medium 2.9
Tomato paste 1/4 cup 2.7
Carrot, raw 1 medium 1.7

*Fiber content can vary between brands.

NU00582Nov. 17, 2009Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, 2009

© 1998-2011 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights reserved. A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. “Mayo,” “Mayo Clinic,” “,” “EmbodyHealth,” “Enhance your life,” and the triple-shield Mayo Clinic logo are trademarks of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research.


Eggs – Everything you need to know

Aren’t these eggs beautiful?

This would be a typical mix of colors from my wife’s sister Beverly and her husband Brent’s hen house.  I’ve never had a better egg than one fresh from the tap.

Ameraucana breed of chicken lays various shades of blue and green eggs, while around 90% of all white eggs we get in the store are laid by a strain of the Leghorn chicken.  Australorp and Rhode Island Red chickens lay brown eggs and Barnevelders lay very dark reddish brown eggs with a matte finish.  There are hundreds of chicken breeds, laying different sizes and colors of eggs.  Some chickens are layers, some are bred for cooking.  Some are quiet, some are loud, some lay a lot of eggs, some a few.

Did you know that a chicken is born with all the eggs she could ever lay already in her?  That is about 4000, even though most chickens rarely lay over 1500 eggs in their life and the average layer lays between 250 and 270 eggs per year.

More importantly eggs are almost a perfect food.  Read this from the Incredible egg site:


New USDA study shows eggs have 14% less cholesterol and more vitamin D.

The amount of cholesterol in a single large egg has decreased by 14 percent according to the new United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrition data*. Consuming an egg a day fits easily within dietary guidance, which recommends limiting cholesterol consumption to 300 mg per day.


Eggs now contain 41 IU of vitamin D, which is an increase of 64 percent from 2002. Eggs are one of the few foods that are a naturally good source of vitamin D, meaning that one egg provides at least 10 percent of the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA). Vitamin D plays an important role in calcium absorption, helping to form and maintain strong bones.

The amount of protein in one large egg – 6 grams of protein or 12 percent of the Recommended Daily Value – remains the same, and the protein in eggs is one of the highest quality proteins found in any food. Eggs are all?natural, and one egg has lots of vitamins and minerals all for 70 calories. The nutrients in eggs can play a role in weight management, muscle strength, healthy pregnancy, brain function, eye health and more. At less than 15 cents apiece, eggs are an affordable and delicious breakfast option.

*In 2010, a random sample of regular shell eggs was collected from locations across the country to analyze the nutrient content of eggs. The testing procedure was last completed with eggs in 2002, and while most nutrients remained similar to those values, cholesterol decreased by 14% and vitamin D increased by 64% from 2002 values.


Jughandle is in the process of starting a back yard chicken coop with a starting flock of 6 chickens.  That should get me between 1 1/2 to 2 dozen eggs per week.  By the way, if you don’t like to hear that constant crow of the rooster, don’t get one.  You don’t need a rooster to have chickens lay eggs.

More to come-