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Grits

As I write this post I am enjoying a bowl of stone ground grits.  Not the instant grits found so often, but real stone ground grits with the little black flecks in it.  Killer good cooked with just milk and butter and slowly boiled to a creamy consistency with the grits left just a little firm or al dente (to the tooth)

What the heck are grits?

Wikipedia says that grits got their origins from the American Indians.  I say thank you.   Grits are coarsely ground flint or dent corn, which is grown hard on the cob.  The kernels are dried on the cob and then soaked in baking soda, lime or wood ash.  The soaking causes the hulls to soften and swell.  Then the kernels are hulled and de-germed using friction methods and dried further.   Hominy is the dried corn or maize that has been treated with a weak lye (alkaline) solution to break down the niacin in the corn which also effects the protein balance, decreasing it.  Even though the protein decreases, the lysine and tryptophan are increased.  Even in the South, most people have never tried Hominy, which look like large, soft swollen white corn kernels.

The best grits, in my humble opinion, are stone ground in the old fashioned way.  You really can taste a difference.

 white hominy   fried hominy

How do we use Grits

Grits can be savory or sweet.  I prefer savory, but I’ve had some very good grits mixed with brown sugar and chunks of fruit that were great.  Without getting too detailed, grits are basically white polenta, the European version of grits which is made from ground yellow or white cornmeal.

Both polenta and grits are cooked to a porridge like consistency then embellished with anything from sugar or honey to cheese, butter, sausage, bacon, ham and even spinach or kale.  Both make a great side dish for any meal.

Additionally, grits or polenta can be placed in a container or glass and cooled or frozen then sliced into rounds and fried in oil or bacon fat.  Delicious!

  

 

Stone Ground grits are available through the Fat Farm Store or click here  – jughandle