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Spaghetti with Egg and Pangritata

This recipe is borrowed from the Circle B Kitchen and is a great example of a filling delicious meal made very inexpensively.  Please check it out and follow Circle B Kitchen’s blog, it’s great! – Jug

Spaghetti with Egg and Pangritata
Recipe Type: Main
Author: Recipe adapted from Food52
Prep time: 30 mins
Cook time: 30 mins
Total time: 1 hour
Serves: 4
As noted above, I found this recipe on the Food52 website and have switched up a couple of ingredients and adapted it for a whole pound of pasta. I’ve made this several times now, and each time I get better at timing when to add the pasta to the skillet. You really need to add it the minute that the egg whites are just barely cooked. You don’t want to let the yolks cook as they will get cooked when you add the hot pasta to the pan. We love the flavors and the crunch of the pangritata topping, which is also great on top of fish and veggies. Serves 4
Ingredients
  • For the Pangritata::
  • cup olive oil
  • 1 1/3 cups coarse breadcrumbs
  • 1 ½ tablespoons of minced fresh rosemary
  • zest of two lemons
  • Spaghetti and Eggs:
  • 1 lb spaghetti
  • 1 tablespoon of olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 6-8 large eggs
  • 1/3 cup chopped Italian parsley
  • 1 tsp crushed red pepper (optional)
  • freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese
Instructions
  1. Pangritata:
  2. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat.
  3. Add the breadcrumbs and sauté until golden and crispy, about 4 to 5 minutes.
  4. Add the rosemary, and immediately remove from heat and allow to cool.
  5. Mix in lemon zest and set aside.
  6. Spaghetti and Eggs:
  7. Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil and cook pasta to al dente according to directions on box. (I usually undercook the pasta by about a minute.)
  8. Wipe out the skillet from the pangritata, add the olive oil and butter and melt together over medium heat.
  9. Add the garlic and crushed red pepper and immediately break the eggs into the skillet.
  10. If need be, lower the heat a bit. You want the garlic to cook without burning and the egg whites to set, but the yolks to remain runny.
  11. Drain the pasta well, reserving 1 c of the cooking liquid.
  12. Add pasta back to the pot,
  13. pour over the eggs and all the fat from the skillet,
  14. add the parsley and toss well, breaking up the eggs as you do.
  15. If you prefer a wetter dish, you can add in some of the reserved cooking liquid.
  16. Plate the pasta and eggs, season well with freshly ground black pepper,
  17. sprinkle with the grated cheese and then top with the pangritata.

 

For my hunter friends and family with deer in the freezer, here is a recipe from “Hunter Angler Gardener Cook” blog that I thought sounded good for the 4th.  Farm On – Jug

Photos borrowed from their site and taken by Holly A Heyser

http://honest-food.net/2011/07/03/venison-burgers-with-mushrooms/

How to eat more produce

Interestingly our veggies are color coded.  Yes, we can chose our nutrition by the color of the vegetables we eat.  According to a so called recent government study 69% of us don’t eat enough green, 78% not enough red, 86% white, 88% purple/blue, and 79% of us don’t eat enough yellow/orange fruit and vegetables.  Believe it or not even the difference between eating green bell peppers exclusively and avoiding yellow, orange, purple and red bells, makes a difference in the health benefits.  We need a full spectrum of colors.

According to Women’sHealth here are a few examples:

Green:
Artichokes- March to June
Asparagus- February to June
Avocados- year round
Broccoli- October to April
Green Beans- May to October
Kiwis- year round
Romaine Lettuce- year round
Yellow:
Pears- August to March
Pineapples- March to July
Orange:
Peaches- May to October
Oranges
Carrots
Red:
Bell Peppers- year round
Strawberries- April to September
Tomatoes- June to September
Watermelons- June to August
Blue and Purple:
Blueberries- May to October
Grapes- May to October
Eggplant
Prunes
White:
Cauliflower- Summer
Onions
Potatoes
Jicama

For a list of many, many more go to Disabled World
Also in the same article by Darrell Miller January 12, 2008

The nutrients found in the above fruits and vegetables have a significant impact on our health.
Quercetin, which is found in apples, onions and other citrus fruits, not only prevents LDL cholesterol oxidation, but also helps the body cope with allergens and other lung and breathing problems.
Ellagic acid, which is mainly found in raspberries, strawberries, pomegranates, and walnuts, has been proven in many clinical studies to act as an antioxidant and anticarcinogens in the gastrointestinal tract. This nutrient also has been proven to have an anti-proliferative effect on cancer cells, because it decreases their ATP production.
The best-known of the carotenoids, beta-carotene, is converted into vitamin A upon entering the liver. Although being known for its positive effects on eyesight, it has also been proven to decrease cholesterol levels in the liver.
Clinical studies have proven that lycopene, mainly found in tomatoes, may decrease the risk of prostate cancer, as well as protect against heart disease. Lutein, which is found in blueberries and members of the squash family, is important for healthy eyes. However, it does support your heart too, helping to prevent against coronary artery disease.
Along with the above stated nutrients, there are even more nutrients found in fruits and vegetables that provide a great deal of support to our body. Almost everyone has heard of vitamin C, which keeps our immune system strong; speeds wound healing, and promote strong muscles and joints. This nutrient is scattered throughout the spectrum of fruits, but commonly associated with oranges and other citrus fruits. Potassium, which is the nutrient most Americans are deficient in, does great things for our hearts, and lowers blood pressure.
Another good food component many people don’t get enough of if fiber, found in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.
Flavonoids, which include anthocyanins, flavones, isoflavones, proantocyanidins, quercetin and more, are found almost everywhere. They are responsible for the colors in the skins of fruits and vegetables and help to stop the growth of tumor cells and potent antioxidants. They also can reduce inflammation.
Beta-glucan, found in mushrooms, stabilizes and balances the body’s immune system by supporting white blood cells. EGCG is found in tea and has been shown to reduce the risk of colon and breast cancer. It boosts the immune system and encourages T-cell formation, which defends our body against sickness and disease.
Bioflavonoids, which are found in citrus fruits, are considered a companion to vitamin C because they extend the value of it in the body. These nutrients have the capabilities to lower cholesterol levels and support joint collagen in arthritis cases.
The number one excuse for not eating the required five servings of fruits and vegetables each day is they are too expensive. However, as compared to the amount of money spent on prepackaged, processed, and fast foods, most fruits and vegetables (with the exception of those that are not in season) are not all that expensive.
Because frozen fruits and vegetables retain the majority of their nutritional value, they can be an excellent alternative when certain foods are out of season.
Someone who is not able to eat five servings of fruits and vegetables each day can also drink fruit and vegetable drinks in their place. Although this shouldn’t become a habit, fruit and vegetable drink mixes can be an excellent substitute when you’re rushed or traveling.
The need for fruits and vegetables in our diet is growing rapidly with the type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and high cholesterol, hypertension that result from the “Typical American Diet” of fatty meats, processed sugars, and refined grains.



Read more: http://www.disabled-world.com/artman/publish/fruits-vegetables.shtml#ixzz1QaD9RLvr

Total time: 7 mins
Yields: 1 cup
Recipe comes from: http://www.food.com/recipe/just-like-hellmans-mayonnaise-copycat-clone-110801

1 – egg at room temperature
1 t – dry mustard
1 t – salt
1 dash – cayenne pepper
1 1/4 c – vegetable oil
3 T – white vinegar or lemon juice

1. Place egg, mustard, salt, cayenne pepper and 1/4 cup oil in blender or food processor and blend on low.

2. While blending, very slowly drizzle in another 1/2 cup of oil

3. stop and scrape sides

4. Add the lemon juice/vinegar and the remaining oil

5. blend until well combined.

Jughandle recommends:

Try using a pasteurized egg for safety.

I use olive oil for a different and healthy taste

Try a dash of your favorite hot sauce in stead of the cayenne pepper.

Yellow Mustard Recipe – French’s Clone

Yellow Mustard Recipe – French’s Clone

This is a recipe that I found at Grouprecipes.com and it was posted by “Tuilelaith.”
Ingredients (T = tablespoon; t = teaspoon):
  • 4 T ground yellow mustard
  • 1/2 t Wondra flour (to thicken)
  • 3/8 t salt
  • 1/8 t turmeric
  • pinch of garlic powder
  • pinch of paprika
  • 1/4 c water
  • 3 T distilled white vinegar
Directions:
  • Mix all dry ingredients together in a small sauce pan.
  • Whisk in water and vinegar until the mixture is smooth.
  • Heat mixture over medium heat, stirring frequently, until it boils.
  • After it begins to boil, reduce heat to low and simmer for 5 to 10 minutes (I simmer mine for 7.5 minutes).
  • Remove pan from heat and leave uncovered for 1 minute.
  • Then cover pan and let the mustard cool.
  • Put mustard in a covered container and store refrigerated
Yield:  1/4 cup
The Wondra flour is used to thicken the mixture.  You probably could use all purpose flour if that’s all you had and you probably wouldn’t notice a difference in the taste.  The Wondra won’t clump as easily as all-purpose flour, making it a more convenient thickening agent.
Condiment Replacement Recipes- Heinz Ketchup Copycat

In our last post, I hopefully put the fear of God in you about some of the additives in processed foods.  We all love our condiments.  God knows, I’m a hot sauce and ketchup freak.  That said, how can we avoid the additives in our favorite condiments.  Largely, we can make our own.  And we can make them BETTER!

This will be an on going  feature.  Look for your favorite recipes under the “recipe” tab on our home page.

Heinz Ketchup Copycat Recipe:

This recipe came mostly from  http://www.topsecretrecipes.com/Heinz-Ketchup-Recipe.html

23 Calories per serving
Cook time:  1 1/2 hours
Makes 1 1/2 cups

Ingredients:
1 – 6 oz can of Italian tomato paste (read the label)
1/2 c – light corn syrup (or honey for a healthier version)
1/2 c – white vinegar
1/4 c – water
1 T – sugar
1 t – salt
1/4 t – onion powder
1/8 t – garlic powder

Combine all ingredients in a medium saucepan over medium heat.  Whisk until smooth or use a stick blender

When mixture comes to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes.  Stir often to avoid burning on the bottom.

Remove Pan from heat and cover until cool.  Chill and store in a covered container.

Jughandle recommends:


Try using whole fresh tomatoes, fresh onion and garlic

 

Make your own tortillas – video

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/4 cups all purpose flour (not bread flour, AP)
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp vegetable oil
  • 3/4 cup hot milk

 

1 Light up the stove or griddle. Get a large non-stick surface hot and ready to go. I like these to cook fast, so fire that baby on up. Set out a heavy plate (that will hold heat) and a spatula to handle the hot bread.

2 Put a smidgen over 3/4 cup of milk into the micro and set on high for 60 seconds and leave it. We’ll cover why it’s just over 3/4 cup shortly…

3 Measure out all of the dry ingredients into the mixer of your Kitchen Aid or a large bowl that you can mix in by hand.

4 Add in 2 tsp of vegetable oil. Yes, vegetable oil. No, I don’t mean butter. It works, trust me. Now mix those items together just a bit.

5 Slowly mix the hot milk in until the dough ball comes away cleanly. You may need to add a little more or less and you may need to adjust with additional flour.

7 Mix the dough for 3-4 minutes then turn out on a floured surface and knead once or twice to shape it some. (Note: To this point you should have taken no more than 5 minutes tops! Yes, the clock is running, come’on! Didn’t you read the post title?)

8 Divide the dough into 12 equal balls, if you are measuring with scales each ball will be somewhere around 2oz in size.

9 Here’s the fun part that you may want some help with the first couple of times. Roll each ball into a 6″ circle on a lightly floured surface and cook them on the skillet/griddle. Each one will take about 30 seconds per side to cook so you can put one on and roll out a second tortilla. Once the second one is ready you can flip the first one and place the second one on the surface. By the time the third one is ready the first will come off and the second will be ready to flip. Lather, rinse, repeat until done.

10 Be standing at the door when your SO walks in with one of these lathered up in butter and waiting for him/her. Don’t ever send them to the store again for something that’s so easy for you to whip out. Seriously, that’s just mean. 🙂

Cooking time (duration): 25 Number of servings (yield): 12 Meal type: snack Culinary tradition: Mexican

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