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Category Archive for: ‘Protein’
Chicken Soup Progressive Recipe (stone soup)

This is going to be fun.  I am going to start out with a “how to make a chicken stock” and you all are going to add ingredients to the soup to make the final recipe. Please

Stock

Start with a very large pot, 12 qts if you have it.  We are going to make a lot of soup to freeze for later.

add 2 gal (8 qts) of filtered water.  If you don’t have a pot that large, fill the one you have about 1/2-2/3 full of water

Add at least 1 whole chicken.  Fryer or a roaster.  I’d pick a roaster because they are larger.

Bring the pot to a boil then reduce to a fast simmer for at least 2 hours.

The chicken should fall off the bone.  Remove chicken from pot and reserve, pulling the bones from the carcass and throwing them away.

Continue to reduce the stock.

1.  (jughandle would add) Salt and pepper to taste

2. (Darlene would add) 2 carrots, 2 celery and  1 onion, diced then sauteed in olive oil before adding.  This is known as a  mirepoix of veggies.

 

3. (Mittie would like to add) fresh thyme & tarragon. If you have a herb garden pick a few stems and strip the leaves into the liquid.  If you don’t like stuff floating around in your soup (I really don’t know why), you can do a bouquet garnie which is just a fancy name for wrapping your herbs in a piece of cheese cloth so it can be removed later.

 

4. Thank you Mittie, it is smelling good now.

5. What we should do now is to remove all the solids from the broth

  • first cool the broth to room temp or cool enough to handle
  • then strain out the solids with a strainer or cheese cloth
  • put the strained broth into a large bowl or pot and put into the refrigerator
  • the next morning the chicken fat will be solid on the surface
  • skim or ladle off the fat.
  • You now have a great chicken stock/broth to use in the following recipes
  • you can also freeze in plastic bags or bowls for later use

6. Darlene wants to make a Tortilla soup from the chicken stock. (please click on the link for the recipe)

7. Jughandle wants to make Italian Wedding Soup (please click on the link for the recipe)

 

 

Soft Shell Crab

One of the best things to eat are soft shell Crabs.  I just love the flavor of a nicely sauted crab and the way it’s naturally sweet sea food flavor is enhanced by the melted butter and herbs.  But my favorite is a soft shell crab Po Boy sandwich.  The crispy fried legs sticking out of  toasted French bread or hoagie roll and smothered with Tartar sauce.  Delicious

Season

Soft shell crabs are in season from May until September, but if you aren’t near the beach, and even then, you’ll most likely be eating a frozen one.  Freezing is not quite as good if the chef doesn’t dry the crab out before cooking.  I’ve only had fresh soft shell crab once and it was amazing.

About the Crab

The crab is a Blue Crab that is molting (shedding its shell) in order to grow larger.  The crab farmers only have a 1-3 hour window of opportunity to harvest the crabs in the “soft” form by collecting the crabs just before they molt and watching them until the perfect moment.   After that the new shell starts to harden.  The hardening process can be slowed for fresh soft shells by putting them on ice, but freezing obviously stops the process completely.

How to Clean

  

To clean the crab before cooking all you need is a sharp pair of scissors.  First turn the crab over and find lungs (left picture above), which are a fibrous like tissue right where you might think they are supposed to be.  Cut them off.  Then look for the apron which is also on the bottom and is hard, cut it and anything that seems too hard to eat off.  Finially flip the little guy over  (right picture above) and cut off the head and eye section.  Pat him dry and you are ready to go.

Buying the Crab by Size

Look in the frozen sea food section of your store or ask the fish monger, they will point you to the right spot.  Many stores carry pre-cleaned crabs or the fish monger can clean them for you.  The Prime size is good for sandwiches, but any size will do.  The larger ones are easier to clean.

 

If you can’t find them at your local store, you can also buy 2 dozen small crabs from our Fat Farm Store , or here at the store for 12 crabs totaling 1.5 lbs and have them shipped to your home.

Look for several recipes from frying to sandwiches under the recipe tab – Jughandle

 

 

 

New Recipe for Dry aged Standing Rib Roast

Just wanted you to know that I posted a great recipe for a dry aged Standing Rib Roast that is easy to do at home with a little planning.

My thoughts on this day lean toward aging, so I thought a lesson on how to dry age meat in your own refrigerator would be appropriate.

For the Recipe – Standing Rib Roast

Quinoa-Stuffed Peppers

Quinoa (pronounced keen-wa)

If you aren’t familiar with Quinoa you are in for a treat.

 

 

 

 

Quinoa is a grain from South America that can be prepared like rice.  Unlike rice, Quinoa is a whole balanced protein and is high in fiber and is gluten-free.  In its raw state it can be spouted in as little as 2-4 hours activating its natural enzymes and multiplying its vitamin content.

To prepare Quinoa buy the pre-rinsed variety which has the hull or saponins removed. Rinse the grain briefly in cold water.  Cook as you would rice.  One cup of grain for 2 cups of water or other favored liquid, such as stock or even vegetable juice.  Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer.  Cook 10 -15 minutes or until the germ separates from the seed.

 

 

 

 

 

With any satisfying meal it is important to not only have good flavors, but combine different textures and even different temperatures.  The crunch of the pepper with the mouth texture of the quinoa and the spice of the tomato mixture and topping provide depth of flavor, texture and spice that is hard to find in any dish.  For a whole meal serve with a cold tossed salad.  This recipe is an original Fat Farm creation.  Let me know what you think. – jug

Stuffed Pepper Directions – Recipe

1. Bring a large pot of water (1 to 2 qts) to a boil.  Put spinach into boiling water for 30 sec. then remove and quickly place in cold water to stop the cooking process.  Reserve.

2. Heat olive oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and celery, and cook 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic, and sauté 1 additional minute. Stir in spinach and  Ro Tel brand tomatoes & green chilies (reserve juice). Cook 5-10 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

3. Stir in kidney beans, quinoa, carrots, and 2 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender. Stir in 1 cup crumbled extra firm tofu. Season with salt and pepper.

3. Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

4. Cut the top off of each bell pepper and with a spoon remove the seeds and as much of the white membrane as possible, then rinse.  Fill each bell pepper with heaping amount of the quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 1 hour. Uncover, top with 1 T of tomato spread and bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and sauce each with seasoned pan juices before serving.

Note: any remaining stuffing can be frozen for later use.

 

Ingredients

4 large bell peppers (use multiple colors)

3/4 c of uncooked Quinoa

1 medium onion finely chopped (1 cup)

2 T olive oil

2 ribs of celery, finely chopped (1/2 c)

1 T ground cumin or 1/2 T cumin seeds

2 cloves of minced garlic (2 tsp)

1 cup of extra firm tofu (optional)

1 lb of fresh spinach, blanched and squeezed dry

1 – 10 oz can of RoTel brand Diced tomatoes & green chilies 

 

 

 

 

1 15 oz can of kidney beans.

 

 

 

 

4 T Tomato Spread or similar *

 

*This topping can be cheese which would be very tasty but would change the dish from vegan to vegetarian.  For my vegan friends, Tofutti brand foods have some acceptable dairy substitutes.  Try the health food section of Whole Foods or your local store.

 

 

These stuffed peppers can be made and frozen for several months.  Frozen peppers make a very fast meal, just put in a 350 deg oven for 30 mins or until completely heated through. – jughandle

 

How to Cook Fish

Believe it or not, according to Cook’s Bible there are 9 ways to cook fish.  I’m going to give you the short course on all 9 today.  Selecting and storing fish is another story all together and we’ll tackle that another day.  I will only tell you that the best way to select a fresh fish is to stick your finger into the meat.  If the flesh does not spring back to its original shape or if it exudes water, that fish has been out of the water too long or was not properly handled.  Fresh fish are like “Friday Night Lights” in that they should have “clear eyes” also.

1. Braising – Braising is a method of cooking in a liquid.  For fish the proper cut to braise is a steak.  Saute the fish steak on both sides with olive oil in an oven safe skillet or Dutch-oven.  Remove the fish and reserve it for later.  Add onion, garlic, shallots or similar ingredients to the pan and saute them for about 5 mins, separately from the fish.  Then add to the pan about 1/2 cup of your braising liquid of choice, which could be anything from water, stock, vinegar, or olive juice to wine.  Bring to a simmer and improve the mix with capers, anchovies, olives or other such stuff.  Return the fish to the pan and put the whole pan in a 400 deg oven for 8-10 minutes per inch of fish thickness.

 

 

2. Steaming – Stove top steaming can be accomplished in a “steamer” purchased for just that purpose or in any deep Dutch-oven or pot that can handle the size of the fish.  Into the deep pot add about 1 inch of water and arrange along the bottom something like cookie cutters or cooking rings or anything heat safe that will hold your fish above the water.  We are trying to steam the fish not poach it (see #3).  You can then put your fish on a plate or pan that will fit in the pot and let it rest on the cookie cutters above the water.  Bring the water to a slow boil and put the lid on the pot.  Steam the fish for roughly 10 mins per  inch of fish.  Most whole fishes will cook in under 15 mins. The picture to the left shows a couple of nice slices of fish in a bamboo steamer.  The cook has placed ginger and herbs on the fish while steaming.

 

 

Oven steaming can be even easier to do.  Place you cut of fish on a large sheet of heavy aluminum foil.  Season fish with salt, pepper or other spices or peppers and herbs.  Squeeze the juice of 1 lemon or lime, or wine on the fish (about 2 tablespoons).  Then fold the foil together over and over from the top, then both ends to create an air tight package, leaving a little space above the fish for steam.  Put the foil fish package on a cookie sheet and into a hot oven, 400-425 deg, for roughly 12-14 mins or until the package puffs up.  Carefully open the foil and serve.  This method is good for fillet or small fish steaks.

 

 

 

3. Poaching – Poaching as opposed to steaming cooks the fish in the liquid but more gently than braising and in more liquid.  While braising is good for fish that has a stronger texture, like swordfish, poaching is great for light flesh or flaky fish such as salmon.  For this reason, the poached fish is more easily handled if you wrap it in cheese-cloth for the poaching.  Place your fish in a large pot capable of holding the fish and liquid.  Cover the fish with your poaching liquid, which could be water, stock, wine or any combination.  Add your flavorings, such as, lemon, lime, bay leaves, parsley, salt, pepper, celery, cilantro etc, etc. Bring the liquid to a rolling boil then turn the heat off, cover the pot and let the fish poach in the hot liquid for 10-15 minutes.  Then remove and serve.  (This is where you thank me for the tip about the cheese-cloth.)

 

 

4. Pan-frying – Pan frying fish is just what it sounds like.  I fry everything in olive oil, both for health and flavor reasons.  Put 1/2 cup of oil in a frying pan.  Bring to a med-high heat (about 375 deg).  Meanwhile dredge the fish in beaten egg then in a combination of flour and cornmeal or Panko breadcrumbs.  Some people use cream of wheat.  Then fry in the hot oil for a few minutes per side or until nicely browned.

 

 

 

 

5. Sauteing – Sauteing is best accomplished with a fish fillet in a hot pan of butter and olive oil.  A small amount of olive oil is added to the butter to raise the smoke point of the butter.  Coat the fillet with seasoned flour or breadcrumbs or some combination of coatings, then saute in a about 1/4 inch of the butter/oil until brown and crispy.  Cook quickly and hot.

 

6. Broiling – This is by far the simplest method of cooking fish.  Just brush the fish with oil or butter and cook the fish in a oven safe pan in the broiler of your oven for 8-10 mins.  You don’t even have to turn over a thin piece of fish.

 

 

 

 

7. Grilling – This is the hardest method of cooking fish.  With sticking a problem, fish can fall apart, so select a nice firm fish such as swordfish or use a grilling basket to hold the fish.  Sea foods are nice to grill.  Shrimp is easy in the shell and lobster is amazing.  The problem with grilling is the heat.  You need a med heat to cook fish, which is hard to accomplish on the grill.  Remember to remove the fish when it is slightly under-cooked to allow the residual heat to finish it off.  Tuna is nice on the grill (see the picture on the left).

 

 

 

8. Roasting – Roasting is the best way to cook a whole fish.  Place the fish on a roasting pan in a hot (450 deg) oven and cook until done, basting with hot oil or butter during the roasting process.  The fish is done when the skin easily peals off or the tip of a sharp knife can easily pierce to the bone.

 

 

 

 

9. Marinating (Ceviche) – Yes, this is a cooking method.  Marinating fish in a acidic liquid for a period of time actually cooks the flesh.  Because no heat is used, you should only try this method with very fresh fish and shell fish.  Cut the fish into small 1/4 -3/8 inch cubes and marinate in the refrigerator covered in vinegar, lime or lemon juice for 4 to 24 hours.  Combine with other flavors and serve.

 

 

 

 

Enjoy your new skills.  Let me know what you’re doing – Jughandle

Jughandle’s Oven Slow Roasted Pork Loin

Jughandle's Pork Loin

Moist tender, melt in your mouth, slow roasted Pork Loin
Servings 10
Calories 373.2kcal
Author Jughandle's Fat Farm

Ingredients

  • 3-4 LB Pork 1/2 Loin
  • 4 T McCormick's Lemon Pepper
  • 2 T Olive oil
  • 1 clove of garlic- smashed optional

Instructions

  • Pre-heat conventional oven to 235 deg F
  • Wash and pat dry Pork Loin
  • Rub Lemon Pepper over entire loin
  • heat olive oil to smoke point in heavy pan or skillet
  • add garlic to pan
  • sear the loin quickly until brown on all sides
  • put loin on roasting pan fat side up
  • insert oven save temperature probe in largest part of loin
  • put loin in oven and cook until internal temperature reads 129 deg F.
  • Remove from oven, cover loosely with foil
  • Rest for at least 20 mins
  • Internal temperature should now read over 140 deg F.
  • Slice and eat while still warm.

Notes

This recipe assumes a 3-4 lb loin. Internal cooking temperature is the key to the success of this dish. Cooking to over 150 deg F will produce a dry flavorless piece of meat.
Beef Chart

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