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Category Archive for: ‘Vegan’
Roasted Potato Stacks – Recipe
  •  Preheat the oven to 350F/180C.
  •  To make the garlic oil:
  •  combine the olive oil and garlic in a small saucepan and gently warm over low heat until fragrant but the garlic is not brown.
  •  Remove  from the heat and set aside.
  •  Peel the potatoes and thinly slice them with a mandolin or by hand.
  •  Brush 8 muffin tins with the garlic oil using a pastry brush or paper towel.
  •  Layer a potato slice in the bottom of a muffin tin and brush it with a thin layer of garlic oil.
  •  Layer another slice of potato and brush it with the garlic oil.
  •  Repeat until it stacks up to the top of the muffin tin.
  •  An alternate method would be to put the slices in a large bowl and toss with the oil mixture until coated.
  •  Repeat until you have a total of 8 potato stacks.
  •  Season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle the potato stacks with the fresh thyme leaves.
  •  Bake the potato stacks in the preheated oven for 35-45 minutes or until the potatoes are golden brown and cook through.
  •  Serve immediately with any main entrees.

Roasted Potato Stacks - Recipe

Author jughandle
Nov 1 marks 5 weeks of my Plant-based diet and counting

5 weeks

I told you that I’d weigh in on November 1 to let you know if eating a plant-based diet helps me lose weight as well as improves my health.  I just weighed in 14 pounds lighter than I was on September 27th when I started this thing.  14 pounds is no great feat, I’m well aware, but I haven’t intentionally tried to reduce my calorie intake.  All I’ve done differently is to not eat meat.  I’ve lost roughly 1/2 lb a day without trying.

Difficulty factor

On a scale from 1-10 with 10 being impossible to do, I’d say that for the first 3-4 weeks it was a difficulty factor of 3.   The last week I’ve been having cravings, mostly because I’m bored with the same old beans and greens.  Last week was a 7 on the scale.  I’m going to continue on my quest for clean arteries through the holiday season, which is going to be no mean feat because I’m going to be cooking for a family of meat eaters over Thanksgiving.  I’m going to feature a nice vegetable dish as the main course with side dishes of meat and fish as needed.  Of course I’ll cook a turkey for Thanksgiving more than likely.

Remember, I don’t have the greatest will power.  Because I’ve had cancer twice and have stared death in the eye, I truly believe that we shouldn’t put off enjoying living.  Life is short and the older you get the more you’ll realize just how short.  Enjoy yourself but don’t take unnecessary risks that might shorten your time on earth.  I don’t care if you believe in the “great void”, heaven, or reincarnation, you’ll only be in this body once, so make the best of it.

This is just an update so I won’t preach to you today.  More on reversing heart disease later in the week – jughandle

More Unusual Pumpkin Carving ideas
Howling Wolf

Wolf

Fighting Pumpkins

Dueling pumpkins

Elephant

Elephant Pumpkin

 

Do You Need a Label?

Some people can’t do anything unless there are rules and a label on it.  And others, like myself, feel that if, say, I’m trying to be a vegetarian but I fall off the wagon, I’m not a failed vegetarian, I’m a Flexitarian in good standing.  If you are one of those people and it gives you peace, see if any of these eating categories is a better fit for you:

P.S. – For inquiring minds, I’m still a Vegetarian – for 3 weeks now – Jug.

Vegan: A person who doesn’t eat meat, poultry, fish, seafood, eggs, or dairy. They usually avoid honey and foods processed with animal products like gelatin, lanolin. Often, vegans avoid wearing animal products like leather, silk, down feathers, and wool. Vegans are sometimes called “strict vegetarians.”

Vegetarian: A person who doesn’t eat meat, poultry, or fish, but does eat dairy products and/or eggs.

Pescatarian: A person who doesn’t eat meat or poultry, but does eat fish; they may or may not eat dairy products and/or eggs.

Pollotarian: A person who doesn’t eat red meat or fish, but does eat chicken; they may or may not eat dairy products and/or eggs.

Lacto-ovo Vegetarian: Someone who eats eggs and milk products, but is otherwise a vegan.

Lacto Vegetarian: Someone who eats milk products, but not eggs, and is otherwise a vegan.

Beegan: A vegan who eats honey.

Dietary vegan: Someone whose diet is vegan, but who doesn’t avoid all non-food animal products, like for clothing and toiletries.

Flexitarian: Someone who primarily eats vegetarian food, but allows for exceptions occasionally.

Omnivore: Someone who eats both plants and animals.

Carnivore: Someone who consumes primarily animal material

Herbivore: An organism who has adapted to eating plant-based foods, not the same as vegetarian.

Lessetarian: A person who tries to reduce their consumption of animal products, but doesn’t necessarily eliminate them.

Grits

As I write this post I am enjoying a bowl of stone ground grits.  Not the instant grits found so often, but real stone ground grits with the little black flecks in it.  Killer good cooked with just milk and butter and slowly boiled to a creamy consistency with the grits left just a little firm or al dente (to the tooth)

What the heck are grits?

Wikipedia says that grits got their origins from the American Indians.  I say thank you.   Grits are coarsely ground flint or dent corn, which is grown hard on the cob.  The kernels are dried on the cob and then soaked in baking soda, lime or wood ash.  The soaking causes the hulls to soften and swell.  Then the kernels are hulled and de-germed using friction methods and dried further.   Hominy is the dried corn or maize that has been treated with a weak lye (alkaline) solution to break down the niacin in the corn which also effects the protein balance, decreasing it.  Even though the protein decreases, the lysine and tryptophan are increased.  Even in the South, most people have never tried Hominy, which look like large, soft swollen white corn kernels.

The best grits, in my humble opinion, are stone ground in the old fashioned way.  You really can taste a difference.

 white hominy   fried hominy

How do we use Grits

Grits can be savory or sweet.  I prefer savory, but I’ve had some very good grits mixed with brown sugar and chunks of fruit that were great.  Without getting too detailed, grits are basically white polenta, the European version of grits which is made from ground yellow or white cornmeal.

Both polenta and grits are cooked to a porridge like consistency then embellished with anything from sugar or honey to cheese, butter, sausage, bacon, ham and even spinach or kale.  Both make a great side dish for any meal.

Additionally, grits or polenta can be placed in a container or glass and cooled or frozen then sliced into rounds and fried in oil or bacon fat.  Delicious!

  

 

Stone Ground grits are available through the Fat Farm Store or click here  – jughandle

Plant Based Diet Progress Report

Three Weeks

It has been close to 3 weeks since I ventured into the realm of meatless eating.  The results so far have been surprisingly good.  I’ve told a few people that I’ve been meatless for 3 weeks and they instantly laugh, like that is no big deal.  Try it, I respond.  I’ve even been able to cook meat for other people without craving it myself.

Where’s the Beef

I haven’t missed meat in the very least.  I’ve been posting meatless recipes lately with the help of my followers and they are very good, not to mention, filling and satisfying.  Finding recipes and adjusting our family shopping habits has been more difficult than not eating meat.

System

My system has changed, and without becoming too graphic, suffice it to say that I am now very regular and seem to process my food very efficiently.  I actually like eating this way.  I’ve been drinking Matcha Green Tea, which has most definitely increased my metabolism and I still drink copious amounts of filtered water.

What foods I find to be Good

I have been eating a lot of beans and gourds.  We have found at least 5 different types of dried beans which have been the staple of my diet and we’ve eating at least 4 different types of squash.  I eat lettuce or cabbage at almost every meal.  I haven’t worried about being vegan since about the 3rd day, but I still avoid eggs and cheese when I can.  For snacks I’ve been eating dried fruit, like cherrys and cranberrys and also roasted peanuts. I have found tofu and other soy products to be “good eats” when prepared properly.  Flavorful sauces  and dressings are very important.  I am developing a bean and soy based burger patty and when I get it right I’ll post the recipe.

When will I Quit

You know, I’m not sure when I’ll ever revert.  If I do it will be to only add meat once or twice a week or only on special occasions like Thanksgiving or when invited to someone’s house.  I’m trying to clean my arteries of plaque and improve my chances of living longer by avoiding cancer causing chemicals.  I’ve had cancer twice, I’m avoiding a third strike.

Should You Do It?

No.  If you have to ask that question then you probably aren’t ready.  Eating a plant based diet is a life style choice.  If you are obese, like I am, and you show signs of other problems, like I do, then you shouldn’t be asking this question, you should be doing it for you and your loved ones.

Weight Loss?

Have I lost any weight?  I really don’t know, because I haven’t weighed yet.  I feel better and I feel smaller and people tell me I look better, but I’m not going to weigh until November 1, because that is not the main reason I started this “life style” change.  I don’t want to be disappointed if I haven’t lost weight.  I’d rather make the transformation first and worry about the results later.

 

Any Questions? – Jughandle

Such a Buzz

Follow up

This is a follow up to yesterday’s post “Turbo Tea”.  There have been several questions I’d like to answer:

  • What kind did I get – I got two kinds so I could see what the difference is between them.
  • I got a $11 – 1 oz  – “The Republic of Tea” brand, Supposed to be ceremonial quality Tencha which I’m drinking today
  • I got a $32 – 1.06 oz Do Matcha Brand tea, Green label Organic  – which is what I had yesterday
  • tools – I didn’t get the whisk or the strainer but I used a metal whisk I had at home (you’ll need it)
  • I didn’t sift the powder, but I bet it would help dissolve it in the water
  • Could I tell a difference?
  • Yes, the expensive stuff has a more subtle interesting flavor – not quite as “dry” tasting, maybe a little sweeter?
  • The good stuff didn’t have the dry after taste that the cheaper one had.
  • I really hate to say it, but the DoMatcha Organic at $32 was way better than the Republic of Tea Ceremonial at $11
  • Maybe it is like “they” say, you get what you pay for, especially in Matcha Tea.
  

BuZZ

Yesterday I got the most amazing tea buzz from the Matcha.  It might have been a caffeine buzz from drinking the Lapsang first, but my increased energy level lasted almost all day, plus I was mellow and in control at the same time.  I’ll let you know if there is a difference between the affects from the cheaper one today.  FYI about caffeine.  Matcha tea  caffeine is on the same level as black tea, which is the strongest of the teas, but only about 1/2 as much caffeine as coffee and the affect is spread out over 6-8 hours because of the tannin in tea.

Conclusions

You really need to do your own experiments to determine which flavors you enjoy more.  I’m doing the Matcha because of the HUGE health benefits.  The flavor of Matcha isn’t what you’d call normal beverage flavor, but you can mix it in other things and I don’t think you’d ever taste the tea.  Consider that I like strange and different things, like peaty single malt scotch, etc., I enjoy the grassy flavor of green tea. 

Both of these tins are supposed to last 30 days.  If I stick to the good stuff, that would be a buck a day.  I’ve spent more to get less, so that isn’t terrible.  I like the energy boost, but I’m very sensitive to chemicals and my reaction might be more than someone else’s.  As I write this line I’m finishing the last of my first cup of the cheaper Matcha and I must admit, the flavor doesn’t compare favorably to the better tea.  I’ll be using the cheaper tea for coloring in mixed drinks and foods.   The experiment continues – Jug

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