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Diets or “A diet that makes sense”

I think we’ve discussed before that weird diets don’t work. Sure, you might lose 10 or 15 lbs on the cabbage diet, then wham, a plateau and you’re stuck. That’s because your body adjusts to your new calorie intake and if it is too low your body shifts into “starvation” mode to keep you from starving to death and you lower your metabolism making you feel crappy and depressed because you aren’t losing weight. You need a diet that makes sense.

 

Most diets deprive you of something you need to be healthy. That’s why you can’t binge diet. To be healthy you need to:

 

Drink 80 to 120 oz of water per day

Yes, you can get water from coffee, tea, coke zero, etc, etc, but those other drinks add toxins and sugar that your system will need to fight to eliminate. Drink water. Actually, better yet, drink water with lemon in it. As much lemon as you want, just no sugar. Lemon in your water helps to neutralize your pH because even though lemon juice is acidic it is processed by the body making it a base.

Eat a diverse, well balanced diet 

We’ve heard that line all our lives, but what does that mean?  It means that you should have a protein at every meal.  Eat different proteins, mix it up.  Eat beef or pork for breakfast, chicken for lunch or fish for diner.  Don’t stop there.  Try new stuff.  Eat lots of vegetables.  All colors of vegetables.

Lots of fruit too.  Try eating vegetables or fruit for snacks.  You can almost eat a much as you can hold.  But its important to lower your desire to stuff your self to the gills.  You do that by not eating sugar or carbohydrates high on the GI scale.

Remember, sugar begets more sugar.  Yes, you do need carbs, but make sure they are complex carbohydrates, allowing your body to convert them to energy over a longer time, using more of the energy instead of storing it as fat.  That brings up the “f” word, Fat.  Don’t fear fat.  Eat natural butter, not margarine.  Eat lean meat but don’t worry about that too much.  Eat and use olive oil in cooking and salad dressings.  You get the drift.  We’ll talk more about it as time goes by.

Exercise when you can

Do what you can to exercise.  Take the stairs, walk the dog, etc. Exercise not only burns calories but also raises your metabolism making your body burn more calories even at rest.

Eat healthy foods

Most importantly, when you put something into your body, make sure it’s good for you.  Read the label, if you don’t know what the ingredient is don’t eat it.  Try to make your own food.  Don’t eat out as much.  If you eat packaged or processed food, don’t eat anything that has more than 5 ingredients on the label.

If you drink alcohol

Try to reduce your intake and drink more red wine than any thing else.  If you normally have a drink or two a night, don’t drink on Wednesdays for a couple of months.  You’ll be surprised at the difference.

It used to be thought that alcohol was treated by the body as a carbohydrate.  It isn’t.  When you take a drink, your body gives priority to metabolizing the alcohol first.  So alcohol is really treated like a fat in the body.

“This is because alcohol is oxidised by the body in preference to fat, thus ‘saving’ fat for storage. Therefore, alcohol affects the diet in the same way as an increase in the percentage of fat eaten. This is something to remember in your weight loss quest.” – BYC

 

In Conclusion

So, if you do all five of the things above and you still aren’t losing weight, the only thing left is portion control.  You are now healthy, just not at your ideal weight because of the stored calories in your past.

You only have one option:

1. eat fewer calories than you burn

But you can do that in two ways:

1. eat less

2. exercise more

Here at the Fat Farm we consider these suggestions as a diet that makes sense and recommend tracking your caloric intake at SparkPeople.com

Their online tracking method will tell you the number of calories you need and even calculate the nutrition for you. If you are diabetic they will track your glucose readings among other things.  Ask me how I use it to keep my recipes and normally eaten (grouped) foods charted.

 

Later – Jughandle

Nov 1 marks 5 weeks of my Plant-based diet and counting

5 weeks

I told you that I’d weigh in on November 1 to let you know if eating a plant-based diet helps me lose weight as well as improves my health.  I just weighed in 14 pounds lighter than I was on September 27th when I started this thing.  14 pounds is no great feat, I’m well aware, but I haven’t intentionally tried to reduce my calorie intake.  All I’ve done differently is to not eat meat.  I’ve lost roughly 1/2 lb a day without trying.

Difficulty factor

On a scale from 1-10 with 10 being impossible to do, I’d say that for the first 3-4 weeks it was a difficulty factor of 3.   The last week I’ve been having cravings, mostly because I’m bored with the same old beans and greens.  Last week was a 7 on the scale.  I’m going to continue on my quest for clean arteries through the holiday season, which is going to be no mean feat because I’m going to be cooking for a family of meat eaters over Thanksgiving.  I’m going to feature a nice vegetable dish as the main course with side dishes of meat and fish as needed.  Of course I’ll cook a turkey for Thanksgiving more than likely.

Remember, I don’t have the greatest will power.  Because I’ve had cancer twice and have stared death in the eye, I truly believe that we shouldn’t put off enjoying living.  Life is short and the older you get the more you’ll realize just how short.  Enjoy yourself but don’t take unnecessary risks that might shorten your time on earth.  I don’t care if you believe in the “great void”, heaven, or reincarnation, you’ll only be in this body once, so make the best of it.

This is just an update so I won’t preach to you today.  More on reversing heart disease later in the week – jughandle

Confessions of a Fat Man

I don’t know about you but my scale and the BMI say I’m “morbidly Obese”
Now, that is an ugly term. I don’t like it and I’d like to be just “obese”.

I haven’t always been this way. For most of my life I was an athlete. I lived and breathed it. Then in or around 1995 I was teaching a few 8th grade kids how to triple jump (My specialty in college.) I felt a pop in my left hip and to make a long story short, I’ve been on and off crutches ever since with a diagnosis of “Avascular Necrosis” of the hip. That is bone death and the only remedy is a $50,000 hip replacement. Since then my other hip has suffered the same fate. I only tell you this to explain that my weight gain is more or less food related and not due to lack of exercise. “What?” You say. “If you have a fractured hip you can’t exercise, please explain.” Ok, I believe that exercise is just a faster way to burn calories and an excuse to keep eating large. I love to cook and eat, I can’t stop. I can stop a lot of things cold turkey, but since we have to eat to live, it makes it hard to give up.  So I have to learn to eat and lose weight.  Don’t get me wrong, I believe in exercise, I just can’t do it like I need to.

I’ve tried most of the popular diets in the last 15 years.  I even lost 47 lbs 3 years ago by joining “SparkPeople” and counting my calories.  I hated it.  Since then I blossomed to my all time high last December at 287.  Wow, that is hard to write, but you have to own it to change it.

I’m an old 58 years, having had cancer twice, making me a survivor of sorts.  In January of this year I had a sit down with myself and decided I needed a permanent solution or resign myself to an early demise.  This blog is the result of my conversation with my alter ego, Jughandle, and also a way to give back to others for God allowing me to spend more time here on earth.

“Jughandle,” I said, “What the hell are we going to do about our ugly self?”

“Jerry”, Jughandle replied, “you know you can’t do a diet for more than a month, and you love to cook and eat too much to stop, you might as well go ahead and die…except for the fact that we both love living so much.”

“I’ve got it,” Jughandle snapped, “I’m going to read and study the interaction of the body to the food we eat and find the best way to lose weight while staying healthy and eating delicious meals.”  “Then we both are going to blog about it to share that knowledge with our friends and others who need it.”

Born from a mountain of fat is “Jughandle’s Fat Farm” and the NO Diet, Diet.

You might be asking, “Jug, have you lost any weight yet?”  Yes, I have, around 27 lbs since February.  Not anywhere near my ultimate goal of 87 lbs or 200 body weight, but a start none the less.

My point of all this conversation is that we can lose weight and stay healthy just by eating the proper type of food at the proper time of day in the proper amounts.

Will you join me.  I don’t care if you lose a pound, I just want you to be healthy.  And there IS a revolution in the making!

Jughandle and Jerry out.

NUTRITION: Inflammation

This is a iPhone app that tracks inflammatory foods

Again from the nutrition tab, a little information about inflammation.

Most of us know what inflammation is, right?  Maybe not.  Inflammation is obvious when you sprain you leg or jam a finger, but now that we are older, I know that I some times have swollen or inflamed parts and don’t know what I did to deserve them.

Our body’s response to an injury is inflammation.  It is natural in the healing process.  But sometimes we can have “systemic inflammation” and not know it while it is negatively effecting our health.  A blood test can detect systemic inflammation by reading the C-reactive markers in the blood.  If you suspect that your swollen body is more than just water retention, consult your doctor.

Controlling Inflammation with our diet

Prostaglandins are produced by our bodies that are both anti-inflammatory and inflammatory chemicals.  These chemicals come from the food that we eat.  Imbalances in our diet can cause production of excessive amounts of inflammatory prostaglandins.  But the good news is that nutrients such as omega-3 fatty acids and the antioxidants we talked about yesterday, allow your body to produce more anti-inflammatory prostaglandins.

The previous information was taken from a great article at nutritiondata.self.com

To learn more about Inflammation and the IF Ratings of food read the complete article:  http://nutritiondata.self.com/help/inflammation

How to eat more produce

Interestingly our veggies are color coded.  Yes, we can chose our nutrition by the color of the vegetables we eat.  According to a so called recent government study 69% of us don’t eat enough green, 78% not enough red, 86% white, 88% purple/blue, and 79% of us don’t eat enough yellow/orange fruit and vegetables.  Believe it or not even the difference between eating green bell peppers exclusively and avoiding yellow, orange, purple and red bells, makes a difference in the health benefits.  We need a full spectrum of colors.

According to Women’sHealth here are a few examples:

Green:
Artichokes- March to June
Asparagus- February to June
Avocados- year round
Broccoli- October to April
Green Beans- May to October
Kiwis- year round
Romaine Lettuce- year round
Yellow:
Pears- August to March
Pineapples- March to July
Orange:
Peaches- May to October
Oranges
Carrots
Red:
Bell Peppers- year round
Strawberries- April to September
Tomatoes- June to September
Watermelons- June to August
Blue and Purple:
Blueberries- May to October
Grapes- May to October
Eggplant
Prunes
White:
Cauliflower- Summer
Onions
Potatoes
Jicama

For a list of many, many more go to Disabled World
Also in the same article by Darrell Miller January 12, 2008

The nutrients found in the above fruits and vegetables have a significant impact on our health.
Quercetin, which is found in apples, onions and other citrus fruits, not only prevents LDL cholesterol oxidation, but also helps the body cope with allergens and other lung and breathing problems.
Ellagic acid, which is mainly found in raspberries, strawberries, pomegranates, and walnuts, has been proven in many clinical studies to act as an antioxidant and anticarcinogens in the gastrointestinal tract. This nutrient also has been proven to have an anti-proliferative effect on cancer cells, because it decreases their ATP production.
The best-known of the carotenoids, beta-carotene, is converted into vitamin A upon entering the liver. Although being known for its positive effects on eyesight, it has also been proven to decrease cholesterol levels in the liver.
Clinical studies have proven that lycopene, mainly found in tomatoes, may decrease the risk of prostate cancer, as well as protect against heart disease. Lutein, which is found in blueberries and members of the squash family, is important for healthy eyes. However, it does support your heart too, helping to prevent against coronary artery disease.
Along with the above stated nutrients, there are even more nutrients found in fruits and vegetables that provide a great deal of support to our body. Almost everyone has heard of vitamin C, which keeps our immune system strong; speeds wound healing, and promote strong muscles and joints. This nutrient is scattered throughout the spectrum of fruits, but commonly associated with oranges and other citrus fruits. Potassium, which is the nutrient most Americans are deficient in, does great things for our hearts, and lowers blood pressure.
Another good food component many people don’t get enough of if fiber, found in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.
Flavonoids, which include anthocyanins, flavones, isoflavones, proantocyanidins, quercetin and more, are found almost everywhere. They are responsible for the colors in the skins of fruits and vegetables and help to stop the growth of tumor cells and potent antioxidants. They also can reduce inflammation.
Beta-glucan, found in mushrooms, stabilizes and balances the body’s immune system by supporting white blood cells. EGCG is found in tea and has been shown to reduce the risk of colon and breast cancer. It boosts the immune system and encourages T-cell formation, which defends our body against sickness and disease.
Bioflavonoids, which are found in citrus fruits, are considered a companion to vitamin C because they extend the value of it in the body. These nutrients have the capabilities to lower cholesterol levels and support joint collagen in arthritis cases.
The number one excuse for not eating the required five servings of fruits and vegetables each day is they are too expensive. However, as compared to the amount of money spent on prepackaged, processed, and fast foods, most fruits and vegetables (with the exception of those that are not in season) are not all that expensive.
Because frozen fruits and vegetables retain the majority of their nutritional value, they can be an excellent alternative when certain foods are out of season.
Someone who is not able to eat five servings of fruits and vegetables each day can also drink fruit and vegetable drinks in their place. Although this shouldn’t become a habit, fruit and vegetable drink mixes can be an excellent substitute when you’re rushed or traveling.
The need for fruits and vegetables in our diet is growing rapidly with the type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and high cholesterol, hypertension that result from the “Typical American Diet” of fatty meats, processed sugars, and refined grains.



Read more: http://www.disabled-world.com/artman/publish/fruits-vegetables.shtml#ixzz1QaD9RLvr

Gut Check – found by Darlene Myer
Food Sensitivities: 10 Best and Worst Foods for Your Tummy
By Jennifer Gruenemay, Special to Lifescript
Published August 23, 2010
Gas, stomach aches, constipation and diarrhea are 
common signs your digestive system is off-kilter. But
 did you know that brittle hair and low energy can also
 point to tummy troubles? Find out which foods will keep
 your gut clogged or moving. Plus, test your yogurt IQ
 with our quiz…A healthy digestive system begins with a
good diet. Eat the right stuff and improve digestion. Eat badly
and you feel like a human garbage can. How you eat can affect
the way you feel too.

“If you don’t digest your food properly, your cells don’t get
what they need to function optimally,” says Liz Lipski, Ph.D.,
a clinical dietitian and author of Digestive Wellness (McGraw-Hill).

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is also home to our most
precious disease-fighting resource: the immune system.

“Two-thirds of the immune system is in the digestive tract,”
Lipski says. “There are more neurotransmitters in the GI
than in the brain and more nerve endings than in the spine,”
she adds.

Your digestive system is vital to your health and happiness.
So how do you keep it working well? For starters, avoid these
5 gut enemies:

5 Worst Foods for Your Gut

1. Red meatThe more red meat you eat, the higher your
risk of colorectal cancer risk. That’s because it’s typically high
in saturated fat, which is tied to cancer of the small intestine,
according to a 2008Cancer Research study.

How to avoid it: Choose lean cuts of beef, lamb and pork.
Eat more protein- and iron-rich legumes in place of red meat.
Grill a Portobello mushroom instead of a burger; it’s meaty flavor
will fill you.

2. Processed meatLunch meats, hot dogs, sausages and
other processed meats are packed with saturated fat, sodium
and nitrates.Processed meats have been linked to colon
cancer, possibly because they are cooked at high temperatures,
which can increase carcinogens.

How to avoid it: Stick to fresh, lean cuts and eat other forms
of protein (legumes and grains) as much as possible.

3. Hydrogenated oilsTrans fats, created when liquid oils are
hydrogenated (so they become solid at room temperature),
aren’t found in nature. They’re an inexpensive way to make
fats last longer on supermarket shelves, but your body pays
a high price: They’re tough to digest and have been linked to
many health problems, including increased bad (LDL) cholesterol,
decreased good (HDL) cholesterol and colon cancer.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires trans fats to
be labeled on food products. But the federal agency also allows
manufacturers to claim zero trans fats if there are fewer than
0.5 grams per serving.

Don’t be fooled: If a food lists hydrogenated oils as an ingredient,
it contains trans fats.

How to avoid it: Get nutrients in foods that are fresh,
whole and natural, and ditch the packaged, processed stuff.

4. GlutenAbout 2 million Americans suffer from gluten
intolerance, says the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Gluten is a protein found in barley, rye, spelt, wheat and countless
other foods such as processed meats, soy sauce, ice cream, cheese,
cookies, pasta, ketchup, salad dressings and more.

Food sensitivities affect 10%-20% of us, and can cause lots of
digestive complaints and stomach aches (gas, cramping, bloating,
heartburn, indigestion) and other symptoms, including chronic
headaches, aching joints and muscles, depression, concentration,
memory problems and poor energy levels, Lipski says.
How to avoid it: A gluten-free diet is the only solution to this
food sensitivity; it’s a challenge but possible.

Check out 7 Gluten-Free Recipes.

5. Lactose
Another cause of stomach aches is lactose, the principal sugar
found in milk. Lactose intolerance affects 30-50 million
Americans, according to the NIH.

Avoiding milk will help, but you don’t have to give up all dairy.
Some lactose-intolerant people do fine with small amounts of milk.

How to avoid it: Drink lactose-free milk and eat cultured
dairy products, like yogurt, which break down lactose. Aged
cheeses (like Cheddar and Swiss) have less lactose and may
be easier to digest.

5 Best Foods for Your Gut

1. Dietary fiber

Our Pick: PrunesFiber keeps things moving through your
digestive system and out. Otherwise, your colon is stuck with
toxins that can build up and cause major health problems.

Your body then begins reabsorbing toxins, hormones and
other substances.

“If you don’t have regular bowel movements, you’re retaining
wastes that your body has finished with,” Lipski says. “It’s like
not moving a stinky garbage bag out of your kitchen.”

A diet rich in fiber protects against colon cancer and cancers of
the small intestine, according to a 2008 study in the journal Gastroenterology.

Fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes are all packed with healthy fiber. But when it comes to staying regular, prunes, because of their mild laxative effect, is the go-to fruit. They’re also a great source of energy, nutrition and disease-fighting phenolic compounds. 2. Probiotics

Our Pick: YogurtProbiotics are those “good bugs” you hear health nuts raving about. Why would anyone willingly eat bacteria?

Because our intestinal flora is made up of trillions of good bacteria that aid in digestion and promote immunity and health. In fact, four pounds of our body weight comes from the bacteria that live in the digestive tract.

The No. 1 probiotic food is yogurt. Yes, it’s a dairy product – the bane of millions of lactose intolerant people – but eating yogurt calms digestive complaints. That’s because it contains live cultures, typically Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, that help lactose digestion.

When choosing a yogurt, make sure the cultures are listed as “live” or “active.” Yogurts with added fiber are even better.

But steer clear of yogurts with a lot of sugar, which hurts digestive health because it feeds the bad bacteria in your GI tract. Plain, unsweetened yogurt is best. Add some fiber-rich berries or honey, which has prebiotic properties, if you need to sweeten it up.

3. Prebiotics

Our Pick: LentilsPrebiotics are food for probiotics.

“Bacteria multiply very quickly but need food once they reach the intestines,” Lipski says.

Prebiotics help good bacteria thrive while driving down the number of disease-producing bacteria trying to invade the digestive tract.

They also promote a more acidic intestinal environment, which helps the body absorb nutrients in food such as the minerals calcium, iron, zinc and magnesium.

Luckily, prebiotics are found in many of the foods we already eat.
Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and inulin are two naturally occurring prebiotics in onions, garlic, leeks, legumes, bananas, asparagus, sunchokes (Jerusalem artichokes) and more.

Lentils, a legume, are a great natural source of prebiotics and dietary fiber. They’re a good substitute for red meat because of their high protein and iron content. To help your body better use the iron in lentils, prepare them with a vitamin C-rich food such as tomatoes.

4. Gluten-free grains

Our Pick: QuinoaGluten – a protein found in grains such as wheat, barley and rye – isn’t necessarily bad for you. But it does cause stomach aches for many people.

Because of genetics, about 30% of us poorly digest gluten-containing grains, Lipski says. But many people, regardless of family history, feel better when they stop eating them.

Expanding your grain repertoire is a good idea whether or not you’re gluten intolerant. Quinoa (pronounced “keen-wah”) is an excellent option. This gluten-free grain is a complete protein, meaning it provides all eight essential amino acids. It’s also fiber-rich and bursting with minerals.

It cooks up like rice (two parts water to one part grain) and adds a unique texture (chewy yet crispy) to side salads, casseroles, soups and more.

5. Fermented foods

Our Pick: Sourdough Sometimes your GI tract just needs a break. Fermented foods are the solution.

“Fermenting or culturing makes food more digestible by actually ‘predigesting’ it for you,” Lipski says.Fermenting also increases our absorption of the other nutrients in the food. Pickles, sauerkraut, kefir, miso, tempeh and Japanese tamari or soy sauce are all easy-to-digest fermented foods.

So is sourdough. It can sub in for wheat bread if you’re sensitive to gluten. Sourdough breads areoften made with wheat flour, but the fermentation weakens the gluten.

If you don’t want wheat at all, many grocery stores offer 100% gluten-free sourdough.

Something to wash it all downDon’t forget the most essential “food” of all – water. Digestion can’t occur without water, so be sure to drink eight 8-ounce glasses throughout the day.

For more information, check out our Digestive Health Center.

What’s Your Yogurt IQ? Whether plain, topped with granola or fruit-laden, Americans enjoy their yogurt for breakfast, an afternoon snack, even dessert. But how much do you know about this versatile food and how can it help improve digestion? Take our yogurt quiz to find out.

The Glycemic Index diet

The Glycemic index is a way of measuring a foods carbohydrate effect on a person’s blood sugar levels, or “blood glucose levels”.  As you might be aware, spikes in your blood sugar level cause cravings.

The long and short of it is that a healthier diet consists of foods that fall in the lower range of the index, generally under 55.  Foods that fall in the high range (70 and up) are risky.  Complex carbohydrates low on the index can even raise your metabolism and help you lose weight more quickly.

The following are just a few to get you started:

Glycemic Index list of foods
Sugars
Fructose – 12-25, average 19
Glucose – 85-111, average 100
Honey – 32-87, average 55
Lactose – 46
Diary products
Milk, regular (full fat) 11-40, average 27
Skimmed milk – 32
Yogurt without sugar – 14-23
Bread
White bread – 64-87, average 70
Whole wheat bread made with whole wheat flour – 52-87, average 71
Muffins, cakes, pancakes, waffles etc – vary between 38-102, mostly between 55 and 80
Crackers
Rice Cakes – 61-91, average 78
High fiber rye crispbread – 59-69, average 64
Cold Cereal
All bran – 30-51, average 42
Bran buds – 58
Corn flakes 72-92, average -81
Corn Chex – 83
Fruit loops – 69
Rice chex – 89
Special K – 54-84
Hot cereal
Quick cooking oats – 66
Instant cream of wheat – 74
Grains
Barley – 22-48
Barley, cooked – 50
cornmeal boiled in water – 69
long grained white rice – 50-64
Short and medium grained white rice – 83-93
Brown rice – 66-87
Pasta
Rice pasta – 40-92
Mung bean noodles – 26-39
Fruit
Apples – 28-44, average 38
Raw apricots – 57
Dried apricots – 31
Underripe Banana – 30
Overripe Banana – 52
Cherries – 22
Dates – 103
Grapefruit – 25
Grapes – 46-49
Pears – 33-42
Plums – 24-53
Strawberries – 40
Fruit juice
Carrot juice – 43
Cranberry juice cocktail – 52-68
Grapefruit juice – 48
Orange Juice – 46-53
Pineapple juice – 46
Glycemic Index list of foods
Sugars
Fructose – 12-25, average 19
Glucose – 85-111, average 100
Honey – 32-87, average 55
Lactose – 46
Diary products
Milk, regular (full fat) 11-40, average 27
Skimmed milk – 32
Yogurt without sugar – 14-23
Bread
White bread – 64-87, average 70
Whole wheat bread made with whole wheat flour – 52-87, average 71
Muffins, cakes, pancakes, waffles etc – vary between 38-102, mostly between 55 and 80
Crackers
Rice Cakes – 61-91, average 78
High fiber rye crispbread – 59-69, average 64
Cold Cereal
All bran – 30-51, average 42
Bran buds – 58
Corn flakes 72-92, average -81
Corn Chex – 83
Fruit loops – 69
Rice chex – 89
Special K – 54-84
Hot cereal
Quick cooking oats – 66
Instant cream of wheat – 74
Grains
Barley – 22-48
Barley, cooked – 50
cornmeal boiled in water – 69
long grained white rice – 50-64
Short and medium grained white rice – 83-93
Brown rice – 66-87
Pasta
Rice pasta – 40-92
Mung bean noodles – 26-39
Fruit
Apples – 28-44, average 38
Raw apricots – 57
Dried apricots – 31
Underripe Banana – 30
Overripe Banana – 52
Cherries – 22
Dates – 103
Grapefruit – 25
Grapes – 46-49
Pears – 33-42
Plums – 24-53
Strawberries – 40
Fruit juice
Carrot juice – 43
Cranberry juice cocktail – 52-68
Grapefruit juice – 48
Orange Juice – 46-53
Pineapple juice – 46
Tomato Juice – 38
Vegetables
Beets – 64
Carrots – 16-92 average 47
Corn – 37-62, average 53
Potato – 56-111
Sweet potato – 44-78
Legumes
Blackeyed peas – 33-50
Chick peas (garbanzo beans) – 31-36
Chick peas, canned – 42
Canned kidney beans – 52
Lentils – 18-37
Canned lentils – 52
Dried split peas – 32
Pinto beans – 39
Soy beans – 15-20
Nuts and snacks
Cashews – 22
Corn chips – 72
Peanuts – 7-23
Popcorn – 55-89
potato chips – 51-57
Candy
Jelly beans – 76-80
Life savers – 70
skittles – 70
snickers – average 55

 

Read more: http://www.righthealth.com/topic/Food_List_Glycemic_Index#ixzz1QMyylbZ9

Read more: http://www.righthealth.com/topic/Food_List_Glycemic_Index#ixzz1QMxaOKhy

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