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Diets or “A diet that makes sense”

I think we’ve discussed before that weird diets don’t work. Sure, you might lose 10 or 15 lbs on the cabbage diet, then wham, a plateau and you’re stuck. That’s because your body adjusts to your new calorie intake and if it is too low your body shifts into “starvation” mode to keep you from starving to death and you lower your metabolism making you feel crappy and depressed because you aren’t losing weight. You need a diet that makes sense.

 

Most diets deprive you of something you need to be healthy. That’s why you can’t binge diet. To be healthy you need to:

 

Drink 80 to 120 oz of water per day

Yes, you can get water from coffee, tea, coke zero, etc, etc, but those other drinks add toxins and sugar that your system will need to fight to eliminate. Drink water. Actually, better yet, drink water with lemon in it. As much lemon as you want, just no sugar. Lemon in your water helps to neutralize your pH because even though lemon juice is acidic it is processed by the body making it a base.

Eat a diverse, well balanced diet 

We’ve heard that line all our lives, but what does that mean?  It means that you should have a protein at every meal.  Eat different proteins, mix it up.  Eat beef or pork for breakfast, chicken for lunch or fish for diner.  Don’t stop there.  Try new stuff.  Eat lots of vegetables.  All colors of vegetables.

Lots of fruit too.  Try eating vegetables or fruit for snacks.  You can almost eat a much as you can hold.  But its important to lower your desire to stuff your self to the gills.  You do that by not eating sugar or carbohydrates high on the GI scale.

Remember, sugar begets more sugar.  Yes, you do need carbs, but make sure they are complex carbohydrates, allowing your body to convert them to energy over a longer time, using more of the energy instead of storing it as fat.  That brings up the “f” word, Fat.  Don’t fear fat.  Eat natural butter, not margarine.  Eat lean meat but don’t worry about that too much.  Eat and use olive oil in cooking and salad dressings.  You get the drift.  We’ll talk more about it as time goes by.

Exercise when you can

Do what you can to exercise.  Take the stairs, walk the dog, etc. Exercise not only burns calories but also raises your metabolism making your body burn more calories even at rest.

Eat healthy foods

Most importantly, when you put something into your body, make sure it’s good for you.  Read the label, if you don’t know what the ingredient is don’t eat it.  Try to make your own food.  Don’t eat out as much.  If you eat packaged or processed food, don’t eat anything that has more than 5 ingredients on the label.

If you drink alcohol

Try to reduce your intake and drink more red wine than any thing else.  If you normally have a drink or two a night, don’t drink on Wednesdays for a couple of months.  You’ll be surprised at the difference.

It used to be thought that alcohol was treated by the body as a carbohydrate.  It isn’t.  When you take a drink, your body gives priority to metabolizing the alcohol first.  So alcohol is really treated like a fat in the body.

“This is because alcohol is oxidised by the body in preference to fat, thus ‘saving’ fat for storage. Therefore, alcohol affects the diet in the same way as an increase in the percentage of fat eaten. This is something to remember in your weight loss quest.” – BYC

 

In Conclusion

So, if you do all five of the things above and you still aren’t losing weight, the only thing left is portion control.  You are now healthy, just not at your ideal weight because of the stored calories in your past.

You only have one option:

1. eat fewer calories than you burn

But you can do that in two ways:

1. eat less

2. exercise more

Here at the Fat Farm we consider these suggestions as a diet that makes sense and recommend tracking your caloric intake at SparkPeople.com

Their online tracking method will tell you the number of calories you need and even calculate the nutrition for you. If you are diabetic they will track your glucose readings among other things.  Ask me how I use it to keep my recipes and normally eaten (grouped) foods charted.

 

Later – Jughandle

Soft Drink Side Effects

Soda, pop, soft drinks, carbonated beverages will mess you up!  You must think that I only write about the evil side of foods.  You might be right.  I promise that I’ll try to find better stuff to write about after this post.  I thought it might be important to you to learn about the side effects of drinking the beverages you see advertised so often.  Surprisingly, most of you still believe that if a food or drink is being sold that some “consumer protection” agency has deemed it safe for you.  NO IT ISN”T.  Just look around.  Notice how much bigger everyone is, especially children, compared to 10 or 15 years ago.

SOFT DRINKS ARE A MAJOR PROBLEM – STOP DRINKING THEM.

The following information is mostly from an article posted by Rodale titled “9 Disturbing Side Effects of Soda”  – please click the link to read the complete story.  I am posting only the highlights. – jughandle

FAT In Strange Places

Danish researchers have found that drinking non-diet soft drinks leads to a large build up of fat around your liver and skeletal muscles.  Fat in these areas make your body insulin resistant which in turn leads to diabetes.  This fact alone shows why there has been a major increase in cases of diabetes in the last 20 years.  All it takes according to the Danish study is to drink 1 regular sized soft drink every day for just 6 months to increase your liver fat by over 135% AND a 200% increase in skeletal fat.  In addition other organ fats, cholesterol and your triglycerides in your blood will show a large INCREASE.

no diet drinks

Diet Soda Won’t Save You

A 10 year study at the University of Texas – ” Researchers from the University of Texas Health Science Center monitored 475 adults for 10 years, and found that those who drank diet soda had a 70 percent increase in waist circumference over the 10-year study, compared with those who didn’t drink any soda. Those who drank more than two diet sodas per day saw a 500 percent waist expansion! A separate study the same researchers conducted on mice suggested that it was the aspartame, which raised blood glucose levels, that caused the weight gain; when your liver encounters too much glucose, the excess is converted to body fat.” 

HELLO – a 500% increase in waist circumference???  I know people who drink 5 or more diet soft drinks per day.

 

 

Cancer Causing Caramel in Cola Drinks

“In 2011, the nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest petitioned the Food and Drug Administration to ban the artificial caramel coloring used to make Coke, Pepsi, and other colas brown. The reason: Two contaminants in the coloring, 2-methylimidazole and 4-methylimidazole, have been found to cause cancer in animals, a threat the group says is unnecessary, considering that the coloring is purely cosmetic. According to California’s strict Proposition 65 list of chemicals known to cause cancer, just 16 micrograms per person per day of 4-methylimidazole is enough to pose a cancer threat, and most popular brown colas, both diet and regular, contain 200 micrograms per 20-ounce bottle.”

Obviously Coke and Pepsi aren’t going to take the brown out of their drinks, so it is up to us to vote with our wallet and stop buying these products.

 

Phosphates in Colas Accelerate Aging

I’m begging you to not believe me and do your own research.  A recent study has shown that phosphates which are also phosphoric acid compounds that are flavor enhancers and preservatives found in lots of foods not only can damage your heart and kidney,  can lead to  muscle loss, osteoporosis and accelerated aging.

 

Artificial Sweeteners Cause Water Pollution

Artificial sweeteners used in our food supply don’t break down in our bodies or in nature.  Scientists can same water from our rivers and lakes and find acesulfameK, sucralose and saccharin.  A recent test of 19 municipal water supplies in the US have shown the presence of sucralose in all of them.  So does that mean our fish will be fatter?

 

 

mountain_dew

Mountain Dew Mind

“Dentists have a name for the condition they see in kids who drink too much Mountain Dew. They wind up with a “Mountain Dew Mouth,” full of cavities caused by the drink’s excessive sugar levels. “Mountain Dew Mind” may be the next medical condition that gets named after the stuff. An ingredient called brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, added to prevent the flavoring from separating from the drink, is an industrial chemical used as a flame retardant in plastics. Also found in other citrus-based soft drinks and sports drinks, the chemical has been known to cause memory loss and nerve disorders when consumed in large quantities. Researchers also suspect that, like brominated flame retardants used in furniture foam, the chemical builds up in body fat, possibly causing behavioral problems, infertility, and lesions on heart muscles over time”

 

BPA

As I pointed out in a recent post, BPA or bisphenol A is everywhere.  It is used to line the aluminum soda cans to keep the soda from reacting with the metal over time.  This is bad, bad stuff you guys.  It will mess up your, and your childrens hormones.

 

Conclusions

I could seriously go on and on about these and other problems, but I just want to make the point and not scare you away.  I’m not perfect, I drink a soda now and then.  I’ll be drinking fewer after this blog.  I just want you to be aware of the dangers and do your own research.  If you get even more excited and want to do something about it, send this blog or a letter to the officers of the soft drink companies and ask them to do some thing about the problems.  You might be surprised to find that they already are. – jughandle

Nov 1 marks 5 weeks of my Plant-based diet and counting

5 weeks

I told you that I’d weigh in on November 1 to let you know if eating a plant-based diet helps me lose weight as well as improves my health.  I just weighed in 14 pounds lighter than I was on September 27th when I started this thing.  14 pounds is no great feat, I’m well aware, but I haven’t intentionally tried to reduce my calorie intake.  All I’ve done differently is to not eat meat.  I’ve lost roughly 1/2 lb a day without trying.

Difficulty factor

On a scale from 1-10 with 10 being impossible to do, I’d say that for the first 3-4 weeks it was a difficulty factor of 3.   The last week I’ve been having cravings, mostly because I’m bored with the same old beans and greens.  Last week was a 7 on the scale.  I’m going to continue on my quest for clean arteries through the holiday season, which is going to be no mean feat because I’m going to be cooking for a family of meat eaters over Thanksgiving.  I’m going to feature a nice vegetable dish as the main course with side dishes of meat and fish as needed.  Of course I’ll cook a turkey for Thanksgiving more than likely.

Remember, I don’t have the greatest will power.  Because I’ve had cancer twice and have stared death in the eye, I truly believe that we shouldn’t put off enjoying living.  Life is short and the older you get the more you’ll realize just how short.  Enjoy yourself but don’t take unnecessary risks that might shorten your time on earth.  I don’t care if you believe in the “great void”, heaven, or reincarnation, you’ll only be in this body once, so make the best of it.

This is just an update so I won’t preach to you today.  More on reversing heart disease later in the week – jughandle

Calories

Are 500 calories of veggies equal to 500 calories of ice cream?

What are Calories?

Calories are a measure of food energy.  In fact there are many different definitions and measurements of calories, but the accepted definition we are looking for is – “the amount of heat it takes to raise 1 measured weight of water 1 degree Celsius.  1 gram of water would be a small calorie and 1 kilogram would be a large Calorie.

To determine how many calories are in a certain food, scientists used to set the food on fire and see how much it warmed a measured container of water.  Now the calorie count is estimated from its carbohydrate, protein and fat content, with each gram of carbohydrate and protein being 7 calories and each gram of fat being 9 calories.  The Calorie we see on our food labels is a large Calorie or the amount of heat it takes to raise one kilogram of water 1 degree Celsius.

Since none of us have a burner in our belly, our bodies have to convert energy by chemical reactions, mostly oxidation of the carbs, protein and fat we eat.

Calories in = Calories out?

Not so much.  Take carbohydrates.  For every 100 calories of carbs you eat, the body uses 5-10 calories just to digest them.  The difference being 5 and 10 is the difference between complex and simple carbohydrates (remember the Glycemic Index?)  It takes us less calories to break down fat in our body.  But look at protein.  The body needs 20 to 30 calories to process each 100 grams of the protein we eat.

How to Loss Weight?

It would appear that if we ate more protein and less carbs and fat that the body would do our work for us.  Not as much as we’d like.  Just because we put food in our mouths doesn’t mean our body digests it all.  According to Men’s Health Mag ” It passes through your stomach and then reaches your small intestine, which slurps up all the nutrients it can through its spongy walls. But 5 to 10 percent of calories slide through unabsorbed. Fat digestion is relatively efficient—fat easily enters your intestinal walls. As for protein, animal sources are more digestible than plant sources, so a top sirloin’s protein will be better absorbed than tofu’s.”

“Different carbs are processed at different rates, too: Glucose and starch are rapidly absorbed, while fiber dawdles in the digestive tract. In fact, the insoluble fiber in some complex carbs, such as that in vegetables and whole grains, tends to block the absorption of other calories. “With a very high-fiber diet, say 60 grams a day, you might lose as much as 20 percent of the calories you consume,” says Wanda Howell, Ph.D., a professor of nutritional sciences at the University of Arizona.”

Exercise Burns Calories Right?

Sure, exercise is a great calorie burner, but you need calories to burn more calories.  Exercise will burn no more than 30 percent of the calories you consume.  Again your body is going to help you burn calories.  60 to 70 percent of the calories we burn are to fuel normal body function like breathing, tissue replacement, blood movement, etc.  Then walking, turning your head, lifting your leg, etc, help tremendously.  Take the stairs, not the elevator.  You get the idea.

Don’t Eat Diet Foods

Diet foods are way more dangerous to our bodies than normal, healthy food.  In diet foods, sugars are often replaced by chemicals like sucralose, aspartame or HFCS.  Men’s Health says that a study at the University of Texas found that consuming as few as three diet sodas a week increases the chance of obesity by more than 40 percent.  At Purdue in 2008 a study showed that rats that ate artificially sweetened yogurt eat more calories at subsequent meals.  Eat the real deal and read the label.

To Answer My Original Question

Are 500 calories of veggies equal to 500 calories of ice cream?  You should now be able to answer that question yourself.

How to eat more produce

Interestingly our veggies are color coded.  Yes, we can chose our nutrition by the color of the vegetables we eat.  According to a so called recent government study 69% of us don’t eat enough green, 78% not enough red, 86% white, 88% purple/blue, and 79% of us don’t eat enough yellow/orange fruit and vegetables.  Believe it or not even the difference between eating green bell peppers exclusively and avoiding yellow, orange, purple and red bells, makes a difference in the health benefits.  We need a full spectrum of colors.

According to Women’sHealth here are a few examples:

Green:
Artichokes- March to June
Asparagus- February to June
Avocados- year round
Broccoli- October to April
Green Beans- May to October
Kiwis- year round
Romaine Lettuce- year round
Yellow:
Pears- August to March
Pineapples- March to July
Orange:
Peaches- May to October
Oranges
Carrots
Red:
Bell Peppers- year round
Strawberries- April to September
Tomatoes- June to September
Watermelons- June to August
Blue and Purple:
Blueberries- May to October
Grapes- May to October
Eggplant
Prunes
White:
Cauliflower- Summer
Onions
Potatoes
Jicama

For a list of many, many more go to Disabled World
Also in the same article by Darrell Miller January 12, 2008

The nutrients found in the above fruits and vegetables have a significant impact on our health.
Quercetin, which is found in apples, onions and other citrus fruits, not only prevents LDL cholesterol oxidation, but also helps the body cope with allergens and other lung and breathing problems.
Ellagic acid, which is mainly found in raspberries, strawberries, pomegranates, and walnuts, has been proven in many clinical studies to act as an antioxidant and anticarcinogens in the gastrointestinal tract. This nutrient also has been proven to have an anti-proliferative effect on cancer cells, because it decreases their ATP production.
The best-known of the carotenoids, beta-carotene, is converted into vitamin A upon entering the liver. Although being known for its positive effects on eyesight, it has also been proven to decrease cholesterol levels in the liver.
Clinical studies have proven that lycopene, mainly found in tomatoes, may decrease the risk of prostate cancer, as well as protect against heart disease. Lutein, which is found in blueberries and members of the squash family, is important for healthy eyes. However, it does support your heart too, helping to prevent against coronary artery disease.
Along with the above stated nutrients, there are even more nutrients found in fruits and vegetables that provide a great deal of support to our body. Almost everyone has heard of vitamin C, which keeps our immune system strong; speeds wound healing, and promote strong muscles and joints. This nutrient is scattered throughout the spectrum of fruits, but commonly associated with oranges and other citrus fruits. Potassium, which is the nutrient most Americans are deficient in, does great things for our hearts, and lowers blood pressure.
Another good food component many people don’t get enough of if fiber, found in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.
Flavonoids, which include anthocyanins, flavones, isoflavones, proantocyanidins, quercetin and more, are found almost everywhere. They are responsible for the colors in the skins of fruits and vegetables and help to stop the growth of tumor cells and potent antioxidants. They also can reduce inflammation.
Beta-glucan, found in mushrooms, stabilizes and balances the body’s immune system by supporting white blood cells. EGCG is found in tea and has been shown to reduce the risk of colon and breast cancer. It boosts the immune system and encourages T-cell formation, which defends our body against sickness and disease.
Bioflavonoids, which are found in citrus fruits, are considered a companion to vitamin C because they extend the value of it in the body. These nutrients have the capabilities to lower cholesterol levels and support joint collagen in arthritis cases.
The number one excuse for not eating the required five servings of fruits and vegetables each day is they are too expensive. However, as compared to the amount of money spent on prepackaged, processed, and fast foods, most fruits and vegetables (with the exception of those that are not in season) are not all that expensive.
Because frozen fruits and vegetables retain the majority of their nutritional value, they can be an excellent alternative when certain foods are out of season.
Someone who is not able to eat five servings of fruits and vegetables each day can also drink fruit and vegetable drinks in their place. Although this shouldn’t become a habit, fruit and vegetable drink mixes can be an excellent substitute when you’re rushed or traveling.
The need for fruits and vegetables in our diet is growing rapidly with the type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and high cholesterol, hypertension that result from the “Typical American Diet” of fatty meats, processed sugars, and refined grains.



Read more: http://www.disabled-world.com/artman/publish/fruits-vegetables.shtml#ixzz1QaD9RLvr

The Glycemic Index diet

The Glycemic index is a way of measuring a foods carbohydrate effect on a person’s blood sugar levels, or “blood glucose levels”.  As you might be aware, spikes in your blood sugar level cause cravings.

The long and short of it is that a healthier diet consists of foods that fall in the lower range of the index, generally under 55.  Foods that fall in the high range (70 and up) are risky.  Complex carbohydrates low on the index can even raise your metabolism and help you lose weight more quickly.

The following are just a few to get you started:

Glycemic Index list of foods
Sugars
Fructose – 12-25, average 19
Glucose – 85-111, average 100
Honey – 32-87, average 55
Lactose – 46
Diary products
Milk, regular (full fat) 11-40, average 27
Skimmed milk – 32
Yogurt without sugar – 14-23
Bread
White bread – 64-87, average 70
Whole wheat bread made with whole wheat flour – 52-87, average 71
Muffins, cakes, pancakes, waffles etc – vary between 38-102, mostly between 55 and 80
Crackers
Rice Cakes – 61-91, average 78
High fiber rye crispbread – 59-69, average 64
Cold Cereal
All bran – 30-51, average 42
Bran buds – 58
Corn flakes 72-92, average -81
Corn Chex – 83
Fruit loops – 69
Rice chex – 89
Special K – 54-84
Hot cereal
Quick cooking oats – 66
Instant cream of wheat – 74
Grains
Barley – 22-48
Barley, cooked – 50
cornmeal boiled in water – 69
long grained white rice – 50-64
Short and medium grained white rice – 83-93
Brown rice – 66-87
Pasta
Rice pasta – 40-92
Mung bean noodles – 26-39
Fruit
Apples – 28-44, average 38
Raw apricots – 57
Dried apricots – 31
Underripe Banana – 30
Overripe Banana – 52
Cherries – 22
Dates – 103
Grapefruit – 25
Grapes – 46-49
Pears – 33-42
Plums – 24-53
Strawberries – 40
Fruit juice
Carrot juice – 43
Cranberry juice cocktail – 52-68
Grapefruit juice – 48
Orange Juice – 46-53
Pineapple juice – 46
Glycemic Index list of foods
Sugars
Fructose – 12-25, average 19
Glucose – 85-111, average 100
Honey – 32-87, average 55
Lactose – 46
Diary products
Milk, regular (full fat) 11-40, average 27
Skimmed milk – 32
Yogurt without sugar – 14-23
Bread
White bread – 64-87, average 70
Whole wheat bread made with whole wheat flour – 52-87, average 71
Muffins, cakes, pancakes, waffles etc – vary between 38-102, mostly between 55 and 80
Crackers
Rice Cakes – 61-91, average 78
High fiber rye crispbread – 59-69, average 64
Cold Cereal
All bran – 30-51, average 42
Bran buds – 58
Corn flakes 72-92, average -81
Corn Chex – 83
Fruit loops – 69
Rice chex – 89
Special K – 54-84
Hot cereal
Quick cooking oats – 66
Instant cream of wheat – 74
Grains
Barley – 22-48
Barley, cooked – 50
cornmeal boiled in water – 69
long grained white rice – 50-64
Short and medium grained white rice – 83-93
Brown rice – 66-87
Pasta
Rice pasta – 40-92
Mung bean noodles – 26-39
Fruit
Apples – 28-44, average 38
Raw apricots – 57
Dried apricots – 31
Underripe Banana – 30
Overripe Banana – 52
Cherries – 22
Dates – 103
Grapefruit – 25
Grapes – 46-49
Pears – 33-42
Plums – 24-53
Strawberries – 40
Fruit juice
Carrot juice – 43
Cranberry juice cocktail – 52-68
Grapefruit juice – 48
Orange Juice – 46-53
Pineapple juice – 46
Tomato Juice – 38
Vegetables
Beets – 64
Carrots – 16-92 average 47
Corn – 37-62, average 53
Potato – 56-111
Sweet potato – 44-78
Legumes
Blackeyed peas – 33-50
Chick peas (garbanzo beans) – 31-36
Chick peas, canned – 42
Canned kidney beans – 52
Lentils – 18-37
Canned lentils – 52
Dried split peas – 32
Pinto beans – 39
Soy beans – 15-20
Nuts and snacks
Cashews – 22
Corn chips – 72
Peanuts – 7-23
Popcorn – 55-89
potato chips – 51-57
Candy
Jelly beans – 76-80
Life savers – 70
skittles – 70
snickers – average 55

 

Read more: http://www.righthealth.com/topic/Food_List_Glycemic_Index#ixzz1QMyylbZ9

Read more: http://www.righthealth.com/topic/Food_List_Glycemic_Index#ixzz1QMxaOKhy